School counselor

A school counselor is a certified/licensed professional that provides academic, career, college readiness, and social-emotional support for all students. There are school counselor positions within each level of schooling (elementary, middle, high, and college). By developing and following a school counseling program, school counselors are able to provide students of all ages with the appropriate support and guidance needed for overall success.[1]

Purpose[edit]

Professional school counselors ideally implement a school counseling program that promotes and enhances student achievement (Hatch & Bowers, 2003, 2005; ASCA, 2012).[2] A framework for appropriate and inappropriate school counselor responsibilities and roles is outlined in the ASCA National Model (Hatch & Bowers, 2003, 2005; ASCA, 2012).[2]

School counselors are employed in elementary, middle, and high schools, in district supervisory settings, in Counselor Education faculty positions (usually with an earned Ph.D. in Counselor Education in the USA or related graduate doctorates abroad), and post-secondary settings doing academic, career, college access/affordability/admission, and social-emotional counseling, consultation, and program coordination. Their work includes a focus on developmental stages of student growth, including the needs, tasks, and student interests related to those stages (Schmidt, 2003).[3]

Professional school counselors meet the needs of students in four basic domains: academic development, career development and college access/affordability/admission, and social-emotional development (Dahir & Campbell, 1997; Hatch & Bowers, 2003, 2005; ASCA, 2012).[4] Knowledge, understanding and skill in these domains are developed through classroom instruction, appraisal, consultation, counseling, coordination, and collaboration. For example, in appraisal, school counselors may use a variety of personality and career assessment methods (such as the Self-Directed Search [SDS][5] or Career Key[6] [based on the Holland Codes]) to help students explore career and college needs and interests.

Schools play a key role in assessment, access to services, and possible referral to appropriate outside support systems.[7] They provide intervention, prevention, and services to support students' academic, career, and post-secondary education as well as social-emotional growth. The role of school counselors is expansive. School counselors address mental health issues, crisis intervention, and advising for course selection.[8] School counselors consult with all stakeholders to support student needs and may also focus on experiential learning, cooperative education, internships, career shadowing, and entrance to specialized high school programs.[9]

Methods[edit]

The four main school counseling program interventions include school counseling curriculum classroom lessons and annual academic, career/college access/affordability/admission, and social-emotional planning for every student; and group and individual counseling for some students.[10]

School counselor interventions include individual and group counseling for some students. For example, if a student's behavior is interfering with his or her achievement, the school counselor may observe that student in a class, provide consultation to teachers and other stakeholders to develop (with the student) a plan to address the behavioral issue(s), and then collaborate to implement and evaluate the plan. They also provide consultation services to family members such as college access/affordability/admission, career development, parenting skills, study skills, child and adolescent development, mental health issues, and help with school-home transitions.

School counselor interventions for all students include annual academic/career/college access/affordability/admission planning K–12 and leading classroom developmental lessons on academic, career/college, and social-emotional topics. The topics of mental health, multiculturalism (Portman, 2009), anti-racism, and school safety are important areas of focus for school counselors. Often school counselors will coordinate outside groups to help with student needs such as academics, or coordinate a program that teaches about child abuse or drugs, through on-stage drama (Schmidt,[3] 2003).

School counselors develop, implement, and evaluate school counseling programs that deliver academic, career, college access/affordability/admission, and social-emotional competencies to all students in their schools. For example, the ASCA National Model (Hatch & Bowers, 2003, 2005; ASCA, 2012)[2] includes the following four main areas:[11]

  • Foundation (Define as of 2019) – a school counseling program mission statement, a vision statement, a beliefs statement, SMART Goals; ASCA Mindsets & Behaviors & ASCA Code of Ethics;
  • Delivery System (Deliver as of 2019) – how school counseling core curriculum lessons, planning for every student, and individual and group counseling are delivered in direct and indirect services to students (80% of school counselor time);
  • Management System (Manage as of 2019) – calendars; use of data tool; use of time tool; administrator-school counselor agreement; school counseling program advisory council; small group, school counseling core curriculum, and closing the gap action plans; and
  • Accountability System (Assess as of 2019) – school counseling program assessment; small group, school counseling core curriculum, and closing-the-gap results reports; and school counselor performance evaluations based on school counselor competencies.[12]

The school counseling program model (ASCA, 2012, 2019) is implemented using key skills from the National Center for Transforming School Counseling's Transforming School Counseling Initiative: Advocacy, Leadership, Teaming and Collaboration, and Systemic Change.

School Counselors are expected to follow a professional code of ethics in many countries. For example, In the US, they are the American School Counselor Association (ASCA) School Counselor Ethical Code, the American Counseling Association (ACA) Code of Ethics, and the National Association for College Admission Counseling (NACAC) Statement of Principles of Good Practice (SPGP).[13]

Role confusion[edit]

Some school counselors experience role confusion, given the many tasks they are expected to perform.[14][15][8][16][9][7] The demands on the school counselor to be a generalist who performs roles in leadership, advocacy, essential services, and curriculum development can be too much if there is not a clear mission, vision, and comprehensive school counseling program in place.[7] Additionally, some school counselors are stretched too thin to provide mental health support on top of their other duties.[8]

The role of a school counselor is critical and needs to be supported by all stakeholders to ensure equity and access for all students, particularly those with the fewest resources.[17] The roles of school counselors are expanding[18] and changing with time[19] As roles change, school counselors help students prosper in academics, career, post-secondary, and social-emotional domains. School counselors reduce and bridge the inequalities facing students in educational systems.[20]

Types of school counselors[edit]

Elementary school counselor[edit]

Elementary school counselors provide[21] academic, career, college access, and personal and social competencies and planning to all students, and individual and group counseling for some students and their families to meet the developmental needs of young children K–6.[22] Transitions from pre-school to elementary school and from elementary school to middle school are an important focus for elementary school counselors. Increased emphasis is placed on accountability for helping close achievement and opportunity gaps at the elementary level as more school counseling programs move to evidence-based work with data and specific results.[23][24]

School counseling programs that deliver specific competencies to all students help to close achievement and opportunity gaps.[25] To facilitate individual and group school counseling interventions, school counselors use developmental, cognitive-behavioral, person-centered (Rogerian) listening and influencing skills, systemic, family, multicultural,[26] narrative, and play therapy theories and techniques.[21][27] Sink & Stroh (2003) released a research study showing the effectiveness of elementary school counseling programs in Washington state.[28]

Middle school counselor[edit]

Middle school counselors provide school counseling curriculum lessons[21] on academic, career, college access, and personal and social competencies, advising and academic/career/college access planning to all students and individual and group counseling for some students and their families to meet the needs of older children/early adolescents in grades 7 and 8.[29]

Middle School College Access curricula have been developed to assist students and their families before reaching high school. To facilitate the school counseling process, school counselors use theories and techniques including developmental, cognitive-behavioral, person-centered (Rogerian) listening and influencing skills, systemic, family, multicultural,[26] narrative, and play therapy. Transitional issues to ensure successful transitions to high school are a key area including career exploration and assessment with seventh and eighth grade students.[30][31] Sink, Akos, Turnbull, & Mvududu released a study in 2008 confirming the effectiveness of middle school comprehensive school counseling programs in Washington state.[32]

High school counselor[edit]

High school counselors provide[21] academic, career, college access, and personal and social competencies with developmental classroom lessons and planning to all students, and individual and group counseling for some students and their families to meet the developmental needs of adolescents (Hatch & Bowers, 2003, 2005, 2012).[33] Emphasis is on college access counseling at the early high school level as more school counseling programs move to evidence-based work with data and specific results[34] that show how school counseling programs help to close achievement, opportunity, and attainment gaps ensuring all students have access to school counseling programs and early college access/affordability/admission activities.[35] The breadth of demands high school counselors face, from educational attainment (high school graduation and some students' preparation for careers and college) to student social and mental health, has led to ambiguous role definition.[36] Summarizing a 2011 national survey of more than 5,330 middle school and high school counselors, researchers argued: "Despite the aspirations of counselors to effectively help students succeed in school and fulfill their dreams, the mission and roles of counselors in the education system must be more clearly defined; schools must create measures of accountability to track their effectiveness; and policymakers and key stakeholders must integrate counselors into reform efforts to maximize their impact in schools across America".[37]

Transitional issues to ensure successful transitions to college, other post-secondary educational options, and careers are a key area.[38] The high school counselor helps students and their families prepare for post-secondary education including college and careers (e.g. college, careers) by engaging students and their families in accessing and evaluating accurate information on what the National Office for School Counselor Advocacy calls the eight essential elements of college and career counseling: (1) College Aspirations, (2) Academic Planning for Career and College Readiness, (3) Enrichment and Extracurricular Engagement, (4) College and Career Exploration and Selection Processes, (5) College and Career Assessments, (6) College Affordability Planning, (7) College and Career Admission Processes, and (8) Transition from High School Graduation to College Enrollment.[39] Some students turn to private college admissions advisors but there is no research evidence that private college admissions advisors have any effectiveness in assisting students attain selective college admissions.

Lapan, Gysbers & Sun showed correlational evidence of the effectiveness of fully implemented school counseling programs on high school students' academic success.[40] Carey et al.'s 2008 study showed specific best practices from high school counselors raising college-going rates within a strong college-going environment in multiple USA-based high schools with large numbers of students of non-dominant cultural identities.

Some school counselors use bibliotherapy, i.e., books and other media, to help students in individual and group counseling and classroom counseling lessons.

Global standing of school counselors[edit]

Countries that provide school counseling[41]
Armenia Australia Austria Bahamas Belgium
Bhutan Botswana Brazil Canada China
Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark
Egypt Estonia Finland France Gambia
Georgia Germany Ghana Greece Netherlands
Hong Kong Iceland India Indonesia Iran
Ireland Israel Italy Japan Jordan
Latvia Lebanon Lithuania Macau Malaysia
Malta Nepal New Zealand Nigeria Norway
Oman Philippines Poland Portugal Romania
Rwanda Saudi Arabia Serbia Singapore Slovakia
South Korea Spain St. Kitts Sweden Switzerland
Syria Taiwan Tanzania Thailand Trinidad & Tobago
Turkey Uganda United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States
Venezuela Vietnam

A school counselor is an integral part of the education system in countries representing over half of the world's population and in other countries it is emerging as a critical support for elementary, middle, and high school learning, as well as post-secondary options.[42]

Countries vary in how a school counseling program and services are provided based on economics (funding for schools and school counseling programs), social capital (private versus public schools), and school counselor certification and credentialing movements in education departments, professional associations, and local, state/province, and national legislation.[43][44]

School counseling is established in 62 countries and emerging in another seven.[42] An international scoping project on school-based counseling showed school counseling is mandatory in 39 countries, 32 USA states, one Australian state, three German states, two countries in the United Kingdom, and three provinces in Canada.[42] Some countries within the Americas, Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Pacific Islands lack formal school counseling programs and instead utilize teachers or psychologists to fulfill the school counselor position with an emphasis on career development.[43] Moreover, In some countries, school counseling is provided by school counseling specialists (for example, Botswana, China, Finland, Israel, Malta, Nigeria, Romania, Taiwan, Turkey, United States). In other cases, school counseling is provided by classroom teachers who either have such duties added to their typical teaching load or teach only a limited load that also includes school counseling activities (India, Japan, Mexico, South Korea, Zambia).[44] The IAEVG focuses on career development with some international school counseling articles and conference presentations.[44] Both the IAEVG and the Vanguard of Counsellors promote school counseling internationally.

Canada[edit]

The roots of school counseling stemmed from a response to the conditions created by the industrial revolution in the early 1900s.[45] Originally, school counseling was often referred to as vocational guidance, where the goal of the profession was to help individuals find their path in a time where individuals previous ways of making a living had been displaced.[45] As people moved towards industrialized cities, counseling was required to help students navigate these new vocations. With a great discrepancy between the rich and the poor, vocational counseling was initiated to help support disadvantaged students.[45] After World War II, vocational guidance began to shift towards a new movement of counseling, which provided a theoretical backing.[45] As the role of school counselors progressed into the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s there has become more uncertainty as to what the role entails.[45] This role confusion continues into the 21st century, where there is a lack of clear consensus between counselors, other teachers, administration, students and parents on what school counselors should be prioritizing.[46]

China[edit]

China has put substantial financial resources into school counseling with strong growth in urban areas but less than 1% of rural students receive it; China does not mandate school counseling.[47]

In China, Thomason & Qiong discussed the main influences on school counseling as Chinese philosophers Confucius and Lao-Tzu, who provided early models of child and adult development who influenced the work of Abraham Maslow and Carl Rogers.[47]

Only 15% of high school students are admitted to college in China, so entrance exams are fiercely competitive. Students entering university graduate at a rate of 99%.[48] Much pressure is put on children and adolescents to study and attend college. This pressure is a central focus of school counseling in China. An additional stressor is that there are not enough places for students to attend college, and over one-third of college graduates cannot find jobs,[19] so career and employment counseling and development are also central in school counseling.

In China, there is a stigma related to social-emotional and mental health issues; therefore, even though most universities and many (urban) primary and secondary schools have school counselors, many students are reluctant to seek counseling for issues such as anxiety and depression. There is no national system of certifying school counselors. Most are trained in Western-developed cognitive methods including REBT, Rogerian, Family Systems, Behavior Modification, and Object Relations.[47] School counselors also recommend Chinese methods such as qigong (deep breathing) and acupuncture, as well as music therapy.[47][49] Chinese school counselors work within a traditional Chinese worldview of a community and family-based system that lessens the focus on the individual. In Hong Kong, Hui (2000) discussed work moving toward comprehensive school counseling programs and eliminating the older remediation-style model.[50]

Middle school students are a priority for school counseling services in China.

School counselors around the world are affiliated with various national and regional school counseling associations, and abide by their guidelines. These associations include:

  • African Counseling Association (AfCA)
  • Asociacion Argentina de Counselors (AAC-Argentina)
  • Associacao Portuguesa de Psicoterapia centrada na Pessoa e de Counselling (APPCPC-Portugal)
  • Australian Guidance and Counselling Association (AGCA)
  • Hong Kong Association of Guidance Masters and Career Masters (HKAGMCM)
  • Cypriot Association of School Guidance Counsellors (OELMEK)
  • European Counseling Association (ECA)
  • France Ministry of Education
  • Hellenic Society of Counselling and Guidance (HESCOG-Greece)
  • International Baccalaureate (IB)
  • International Society of Psychotherapy and Counselling (ISPC)
  • International Vanguard of Counsellors (IVC)
  • International Association for Educational and Vocational Guidance (IAEVG)
  • Association Internationale d'Orientation Scolaire et Professionnelle (AIOSP)
  • Internationale Vereinigung für Schul- und Berufsberatung (IVSBB)
  • Asociación Internacional para la Orientación Educativa y Profesional (AIOEP)
  • Institute of Guidance Counselors (IGC) (Ireland)
  • Kenya Association of Professional Counselors (KAPC)
  • Department of Education-Malta
  • New Zealand Association of Counsellors/Te Roopu Kaiwhiriwhiri o Aotearoa (NZAC)
  • Counseling Association of Nigeria (CASSON)
  • Philippine Guidance and Counseling Association (PGCA)
  • Counseling & Psychotherapy in Scotland (COSCA)
  • Singapore Association for Counseling (SAC)
  • Federación Española de Orientación y Psicopedagogía (FEOP-Spain)
  • The Taiwan Guidance and Counseling Association (TGCA)
  • Counselling Children and Young People (BACP affiliate, UK)
  • British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP-UK)
  • American Counseling Association (ACA-USA)
  • American School Counselor Association (ASCA-USA)
  • Center for Excellence in School Counseling and Leadership (CESCaL) (USA)
  • Center for School Counseling Outcome Research (CSCOR-USA) Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP-USA and international)
  • National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC, USA)
  • National Office for School Counselor Advocacy (NOSCA) at The College Board (USA)
  • National Center for Transforming School Counseling (NCTSC) at The Education Trust (USA)
  • Overseas Association of College Admissions Counselors (OACAC an affiliate of National Association of College Admissions Counselors-USA)
  • Canadian Counselling and Psychotherapy Association – National School Counsellors Chapter (CPPA)[51]
  • Newfoundland and Labrador Counsellors' and Psychologists' Association[52]
  • PEI Counselling Association[52]
  • British Columbia School Counsellors[52]
  • Guidance Council of the Alberta Teachers' Association[52]
  • Ontario School Counsellors' Association[52]
  • Nova Scotia School Counsellors Association[52]

Education, certification, training, & accreditation[edit]

In the United States, a master's degree in counseling, school counseling, or related fields is required to become a school counselor. A few states may require additional training and/or certification to be eligible for employment. However, all public school counselors must receive a state government issued credential in order to practice counseling.[53] Obtaining  certification/licensure requires a master's degree, an internship and/or practicum experience with a licensed school counselor, and completion of either a state or national test.[54] A few states may require counselors to have classroom teaching experience prior to becoming a school counselor.[53]

Those wanting to pursue a career in school counseling should ensure that their university program maintains the appropriate accreditation. In the United States, the largest accreditation body for Counselor Education/School Counseling programs is the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP).[55] International Counselor Education programs are accredited through a CACREP affiliate, the International Registry of Counselor Education Programs (IRCEP).

The education of school counselors around the world varies based on the laws and cultures of countries and the historical influences of their educational and credentialing systems and professional identities related to who delivers academic, career, college readiness, and personal/social information, advising, curriculum, and counseling and related services.[56]

Additional information is needed to review the necessary requirements for other countries.

Salary, benefits, and expected job growth[edit]

In 2021, the median pay for school counselors in the United States was $60,510 annually or $29.09 per hour. But, a school counselor's salary can range anywhere between $37,550 to $98,190 according the most recent report completed by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.[53]

Most State Education Boards require that school districts offer school counselors health, dental, and vision insurance. Additionally, school counselors can receive retirement plans as well as professional development assistance.[57][58] Lastly, school counselors enjoy the same vacation time as students, meaning counselors receive time off for each holiday that falls within the school calendar as well as a summer vacation each year.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects the school counselor position to grow 10% between 2021 and 2031; meaning there will be an additional 32,000 job openings within the next 10 years.[53]

Additional information is needed to report on worldwide salary, benefits, and expected job growth statistics.

Notable school counselors[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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Evidence- and research-based school counseling articles, books, DVDs[edit]

Abilities, disabilities, gifts, talents, and special education in school counseling[edit]

  • Bauman, S. S. M. (2010). "School counselors and survivors of childhood cancer: Reconceptualizing and advancing the cure". Professional School Counseling. 14 (2): 156–164. doi:10.5330/prsc.14.2.k047w39u78hm1713 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Chen-Hayes, S. F., Ockerman, M. S., & Mason, E. C. M. (2014). 101 solutions for school counselors and leaders in challenging times. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.
  • Erford, B. T.; Erford, B. M.; Lattanzi, G.; Weller, J.; Schein, H.; Wolf, E.; Hughes, M.; Darrow, J.; Savin-Murphy, J.; Peacock, E. (2011). "Counseling outcomes from 1990 to 2008 for school-age youth with depression: A meta-analysis". Journal of Counseling & Development. 89 (4): 439–458. doi:10.1002/j.1556-6676.2011.tb02841.x.
  • Hamlet, H. S.; Gergar, P. G.; Shaefer, B. A. (2011). "Students living with chronic illness: The school counselor's role". Professional School Counseling. 14: 202–210. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2011-14.202 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Krell, M.; Perusse, R. (2012). "Providing college readiness counseling for students with Autism spectrum disorders: A Delphi study to guide school counselors". Professional School Counseling. 16: 29–39. doi:10.1177/2156759X1201600104. S2CID 72577317.
  • Marshak, L. E., Dandeneau, C. J., Prezant, F. P., & L'Amoreaux, N. A. (2009). The school counselor's guide to helping students with disabilities. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
  • Milsom, A (2007). "Interventions to assist students with disabilities through school transitions". Professional School Counseling. 10 (3): 273–278. doi:10.5330/prsc.10.3.c322443236564507 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Milsom, A (2006). "Creating positive school experiences for students with disabilities". Professional School Counseling. 10: 66–72. doi:10.5330/prsc.10.1.ek6317552h2kh4m6 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Milsom, A.; Dietz, L. (2009). "Defining college readiness for students with learning disabilities: A Delphi study". Professional School Counseling. 12 (4): 315–323. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-12.315 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Peterson, J. S. (2006). "Addressing counseling needs of gifted students". Professional School Counseling. 10: 43–51. doi:10.5330/prsc.10.1.b76h32717q632tqn (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Trolley, B. C., Haas, H. S., & Patti, D. C. (2009). The school counselor's guide to special education. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
  • Wood, S. M. (2010). "Best practices in counseling the gifted in schools: What's really happening". Gifted Child Quarterly. 54: 42–58. doi:10.1177/0016986209352681. S2CID 145307205.
  • Wood, S. M. (2010). "Nurturing a garden: A qualitative investigation into school counselors' experiences with gifted students". Journal for the Education of the Gifted. 34: 261–302.
  • Wood, S. M. (2009). "Counseling concerns of gifted and talented adolescents: Implications for school counselors". Journal of School Counseling. 7: 1.
  • Wood, S. M.; Portman, T.; Cigrand, D. L.; Colangelo, N. (2010). "School counselors' perceptions and experience with acceleration as a program option for gifted and talented students". Gifted Child Quarterly. 54 (3): 168–178. doi:10.1177/0016986210367940. S2CID 143893497.

Academic interventions, closing achievement gaps[edit]

  • Blanco, P. J.; Ray, D. C. (2011). "Play therapy in elementary schools: A best practice for improving academic achievement". Journal of Counseling & Development. 89 (2): 235–243. doi:10.1002/j.1556-6678.2011.tb00083.x.
  • Bodenhorn, N.; Wolfe, E. W.; Airen, O. E. (2010). "School counselor program choice and self-efficacy: Relationship to achievement gap and equity". Professional School Counseling. 13 (3): 165–174. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-13.165 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Brigman, G. A.; Campbell, C. (2003). "Helping students improve academic achievement and school success behavior". Professional School Counseling. 7: 91–98.
  • Brigman, G. A.; Webb, L. D.; Campbell, C. (2007). "Building skills for school success: Improving the academic and social competence of students". Professional School Counseling. 10 (3): 279–288. doi:10.5330/prsc.10.3.v850256191627227 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Bruce, A. M.; Getch, Y. Q.; Ziomek-Daigle, J. (2009). "Closing the gap: A group counseling approach to improve test performance of African-American students". Professional School Counseling. 12 (6): 450–457. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-12.450 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Chen-Hayes, S. F., Ockerman, M. S., & Mason, E. C. M. (2014). 101 solutions for school counselors and leaders in challenging times. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.
  • Cholewa, B.; West-Olatunji, C. (2008). "Exploring the relationship among cultural discontinuity, psychological distress, and academic achievement outcomes for low-income, culturally diverse students". Professional School Counseling. 12: 54–61. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-12.54 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Hatch, T. (2014). "The use of data in school counseling: Hatching results for students programs, and the profession." Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
  • Holcomb-McCoy, C. (2007). School counseling to close the achievement gap: A social justice framework for success. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
  • Holcomb-McCoy, C (2007). "Transitioning to high school: Issues and challenges for African American students". Professional School Counseling. 10 (3): 253–260. doi:10.5330/prsc.10.3.t786743452x51lk2 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Jeynes, W (2007). "The relationship between parental involvement and urban secondary school student academic achievement: A meta-analysis". Urban Education. 42: 82–110. doi:10.1177/0042085906293818. hdl:2027.42/148265. S2CID 143501110.
  • Johnson, R. S. (2002). Using data to close the achievement gap: How to measure equity in our schools. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.
  • Mason, E. C. M.; Ockerman, M. S.; Chen-Hayes, S. F. (2013). "Change-Agent-for-Equity (CAFE) model: A framework for school counselor identity" (PDF). Journal of School Counseling. 11: 4. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2017-08-08.
  • Miranda, A.; Webb, L.; Brigman, G.; Peluso, P. (2007). "Student success skills: A promising program to close the academic achievement gaps of African American and Latino Students". Professional School Counseling. 10 (5): 490–497. doi:10.5330/prsc.10.5.rx6g3g7141w2310q (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Newman, B. M.; Lohman, B. J.; Myers, M. C.; Newman, P. R. (2000). "Experiences of urban youth navigating the transition to ninth grade". Journal of Youth and Society. 31 (4): 387–416. doi:10.1177/0044118x00031004001. S2CID 144022122.
  • Newman, B. M.; Myers, M.C.; Newman, P. R.; Lohman, B. J.; Smith, V. L. (2000). "The transition to high school for academically promising, urban, low-income African American youth". Adolescence. 35 (137): 45–66. PMID 10841296.
  • Poynton, T. A.; Carlson, M. W.; Hopper, J. A.; Carey, J. C. (2006). "Evaluating the impact of an innovative approach to integrate conflict resolution into the academic curriculum on middle school students' academic achievement". Professional School Counseling. 9: 190–196. doi:10.5330/prsc.9.3.l6012ln4661857u3 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Schellenberg, R.; Grothaus, T. (2011). "Using culturally competent responsive services to improve student achievement and behavior". Professional School Counseling. 14: 222–230. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2011-14.222 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Schellenberg, R.; Grothaus, T. (2009). "Promoting cultural responsiveness and closing the achievement gap with standards blending". Professional School Counseling. 12 (6): 440–449. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-12.440 (inactive 2024-02-07). S2CID 154178037.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Schellenberg, R. (2008). The new school counselor: Strategies for universal academic achievement. Lanham, MD: Rowman Littlefield Education.
  • Sciarra, D. T. (2010). "Predictive factors in intensive math course-taking in high school". Professional School Counseling. 13 (3): 196–207. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-13.196 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Squier, K. L., Nailor, P., & Carey, J. C. (2014). Achieving excellence in school counseling through motivation, self-direction, self-knowledge, and relationships. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.
  • Suh, S.; Suh, J.; Houston, I. (2007). "Predictors of categorical at–risk high school dropouts". Journal of Counseling and Development. 85 (2): 196–203. doi:10.1002/j.1556-6678.2007.tb00463.x.
  • Suh, S.; Suh, J. (2007). "Risk factors and levels of risk for high school dropouts". Professional School Counseling. 10 (3): 297–306. doi:10.5330/prsc.10.3.w26024vvw6541gv7 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Trusty, J.; Mellin, E. A.; Herbert, J. T. (2008). "Closing achievement gaps: Roles and tasks of elementary school counselors". Elementary School Journal. 108 (5): 407–421. doi:10.1086/589470. S2CID 21707170.
  • Tucker, C.; Dixon, A.; Griddine, K. (2010). "Academically successful African American male urban high school students' experiencing of mattering to others at school". Professional School Counseling. 14 (2): 135–145. doi:10.5330/prsc.14.2.k215671rj018g134 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Villalba, J. A.; Akos, P.; Keeter, K.; Ames, A. (2007). "Promoting Latino student achievement and development through the ASCA National Model". Professional School Counseling. 12: 272–279.
  • Webb, L. D.; Brigman, G. A. (2006). "Student success skills: Tools and strategies for improved academic and social outcomes". Professional School Counseling. 10 (2): 112–120. doi:10.5330/prsc.10.2.9612807w81q8v374 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Weinbaum, A. T., Allen, D., Blythe, T., Simon, K., Seidel, S., & Rubin, C. (2004). Teaching as inquiry: Asking hard questions to improve student achievement. New York: Teachers College Press.
  • West-Olatunji, C.; Shure, L; Pringle, R.; Adams, T.; Lewis, D.; Cholewa, B. (2010). "Exploring how school counselors position low-income African American girls as mathematics and science learners". Professional School Counseling. 13 (3): 184–195. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-13.184 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)

Accountability; evidence- and data-based school counseling program curricula, evaluation, and practices[edit]

  • Astramovich, R. L., Hoskins, W. J., & Coker, J. K. (2008). The Accountability Bridge: A model for evaluating school counseling programs. Dubuque, IA: Kendall Hunt.
  • Brigman, G., Lemberger, M., & Moor, M. (2012). Striving to evince educational excellence: Measures for Adlerian counselors to demonstrate impact on student achievement and behavior. Journal of Individual Psychology.
  • Brigman, G., Villares, E., & Webb, L. (2013). The efficacy of individual psychology approaches for improving student achievement and behavior. Journal of Individual Psychology.
  • Brigman, G.; Webb, L. (2008). "Education: An Individual Psychology approach to school consultation". Journal of Individual Psychology. 64: 506–515.
  • Camizzi, E.; Clark, M. A.; Yacco, S.; Goodman, W. (2009). "Becoming "difference makers": School-university collaboration to create, implement, and evaluate data-driven counseling interventions". Professional School Counseling. 12 (6): 471–479. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-12.471 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Carey, J.; Dimmitt, C. (2012). "School counseling and student outcomes: Summary of six statewide studies". Professional School Counseling. 16 (2): 146–153. doi:10.1177/2156759X0001600204. S2CID 145374780.
  • Carey, J. C.; Dimmitt, C.; Hatch, T. A.; Lapan, R. T.; Whiston, S. C. (2008). "Report of the national panel for evidence-based school counseling: Outcome research coding protocol and evaluation of student success skills and second step". Professional School Counseling. 11 (3): 197–206. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-11.197 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Chen-Hayes, S. F. (2007). "The ACCESS Questionnaire: Assessing K-12 school counseling programs and interventions to ensure equity and success for every student". Counseling and Human Development. 39: 1–10.
  • Chen-Hayes, S. F., Ockerman, M. S., & Mason, E. C. M. (2014). 101 solutions for school counselors and leaders in challenging times. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.
  • Dahir, C. A.; Stone, C. B. (2009). "School counselor accountability: The path to social justice and systemic change". Journal of Counseling & Development. 87: 12–20. doi:10.1002/j.1556-6678.2009.tb00544.x.
  • Dimmitt, C (2009). "Why evaluation matters: Determining effective school counseling practices". Professional School Counseling. 12 (6): 395–399. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-12.395 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Dimmitt, C., Carey, J. C., & Hatch, T. (2007). Evidence-based school counseling: Making a difference with data-driven practices. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
  • Gruman, D. H.; Hoelzen, B. (2011). "Determining responsiveness to school counseling interventions using behavioral observations". Professional School Counseling. 14: 183–90. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2011-14.183 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Hatch, T. (2014). "The use of data in school counseling: Hatching results for students programs, and the profession." Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
  • Hayes, R. L.; Nelson, J.-L.; Tabin, M.; Pearson, G.; Worthy, C. (2002). "Using school-wide data to advocate for student success". Professional School Counseling. 6: 86–95.
  • Holcomb-McCoy, C.; Gonzalez, I.; Johnston, G. (2009). "School counselor dispositions as predictors of data usage". Professional School Counseling. 12 (5): 343–351. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-12.343 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Isaacs, M. L. (2003). "Data-driven decision-making: The engine of accountability". Professional School Counseling. 6: 288–295.
  • Lapan, R. T. (2012). "Comprehensive school counseling programs: In some schools for some students but not in all schools for all students". Professional School Counseling. 16 (2): 84–88. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2012-16.84 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Lemberger, M. E.; Brigman, G.; Webb; Moore, M. M. (2013). "Student Success Skills: An evidence-based cognitive and social change theory for student achievement". Journal of Education. 192 (2–3): 89–100. doi:10.1177/0022057412192002-311. S2CID 147932506.
  • Leon, A.; Villares, E.; Brigman, G.; Webb, L.; Peluso, P. (2011). "Closing the achievement gap of Hispanic students: A school counseling response". Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation. 2: 73–86. doi:10.1177/2150137811400731. S2CID 145490061.
  • Mariani, M., Webb, L., Villares, E., & Brigman, G. (2012). Effects of participation in student success skills on pro-social and bullying behavior.
  • Martin, I.; Carey, J. C. (2012). "Evaluation capacity within state-level school counseling programs: A cross-case analysis". Professional School Counseling. 15 (3): 132–143. doi:10.1177/2156759X1201500302. S2CID 220172240.
  • Poynton, T. A. (2009). "Evaluating the effectiveness of a professional development workshop to increase school counselors' use of data: The role of technology". Journal of Counselor Preparation and Supervision. 1: 29–48. doi:10.7729/11.0107.
  • Poynton, T. A.; Carey, J. C. (2006). "An integrated model of data-based decision making for school counseling". Professional School Counseling. 10 (2): 121–130. doi:10.5330/prsc.10.2.r5616876nt044766 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Scarborough, J. L.; Culbreth, J. R. (2008). "Examining discrepancies between actual and preferred practice of school counselors". Journal of Counseling & Development. 86 (4): 446–459. doi:10.1002/j.1556-6678.2008.tb00533.x.
  • Scarborough, J. L. (2005). "The school counselor activity rating scale: An instrument for gathering process data". Professional School Counseling. 8: 274–283.
  • Schellenberg, R.; Grothaus, T. (2009). "Promoting cultural responsiveness and closing the achievement gap with standards blending". Professional School Counseling. 12 (6): 440–449. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-12.440 (inactive 2024-02-07). S2CID 154178037.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Schellenberg, R (2007). "Standards blending: Aligning school counseling programs with school academic achievement missions". Virginia Counselors Journal. 29: 13–20.
  • Sink, C. A. (2009). "School counselors as accountability leaders: Another call for action". Professional School Counseling. 13 (2): 68–74. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-13.68 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Sink, C. A.; Spencer, L. R. (2005). "My Class Inventory-Short Form as an accountability tool for elementary school counselors to measure classroom climate". Professional School Counseling. 9: 37–48. doi:10.5330/prsc.9.1.y720844684111402 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Stone, C. B., & Dahir, C. A. (2011). School counselor accountability: A MEASURE of student success (3rd ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.
  • Studer, J. R.; Oberman, A. H.; Womack, R. H. (2006). "Producing evidence to show counseling effectiveness in schools". Professional School Counseling. 9 (4): 385–391. doi:10.5330/prsc.9.4.106k25443020h5g7 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Villares, E., Brigman, G., & Maier, A. (2010). Student Success Skills: Building quality worlds and advocating for school counseling programs. International Journal of Choice Theory and Reality Therapy, 1.
  • Villares, E.; Brigman, G.; Peluso, P. (2008). "Ready to Learn: An evidence-based Individual Psychology-linked curriculum for prekindergarten through first grade". Journal of Individual Psychology. 64: 386–402.
  • Villares, E., Frain, M., Brigman, G., Webb, L., & Peluso, P. (2012). The impact of Student Success Skills on standardized test scores: A meta-analysis Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation,doi 2150137811434041
  • Villares, E.; Lemberger, M.; Brigman, G. (2011). "Student Success Skills: An evidence-based school counseling program grounded in humanistic theory". Journal of Humanistic Counseling, Education and Development. 50: 1.
  • Webb, L.; Lemberger, M.; Brigman, G. (2008). "Student Success Skills: A review of a research-based school counselor intervention influenced by Individual Psychology". Journal of Individual Psychology. 64: 339–352.
  • Whiston, S. C.; Aricak, T. (2008). "Development and initial investigation of the School Counseling Program Evaluation Scale". Professional School Counseling. 11 (4): 253–261. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-11.253 (inactive 2024-02-07). S2CID 144776973.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Young, A.; Kaffenberger, C. J. (2011). "The beliefs and practices of school counselors who use data to implement comprehensive school counseling programs". Professional School Counseling. 15 (2): 67–76. doi:10.1177/2156759X1101500204. S2CID 143978554.
  • Young, A., & Kaffenberger, C. (2009). Making data work (2nd ed.) Alexandria, VA: American School Counselor Association.

Advocacy, empowerment, equity, social justice[edit]

  • Akos, P.; Lambie, G. W.; Milsom, A.; Gilbert, K. (2007). "Early adolescents' aspirations and academic tracking: An exploratory investigation". Professional School Counseling. 11: 57–64. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-11.57 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Bemak, F.; Chung, R. C.-Y. (2005). "Advocacy as a critical role for urban school counselors: Working toward equity and social justice". Professional School Counseling. 8: 196–202.
  • Bryan, J., Moore-Thomas, C., Day-Vines, N. L., Holcomb-McCoy, C., & Mitchell, N. (2009). Characteristics of students who receive school counseling services: Implications for practice and research. Journal of School Counseling, 7 .
  • Chen-Hayes, S. F., Ockerman, M. S., & Mason, E. C. M. (2014). 101 solutions for school counselors and leaders in challenging times. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.
  • Clemens, E. V.; Shipp, A.; Kimbel, T. (2011). "Investigating the psychometric properties of School Counselor Self-Advocacy Questionnaire". Professional School Counseling. 15: 34–44. doi:10.1177/2156759X1101500101. S2CID 143176361.
  • Cox, A. A., & Lee, C. C. (2007). Challenging educational inequities: School counselors as agents of social justice. In C. C. Lee, (Ed.)., Counseling for social justice, 2nd ed. (pp. 3–14). Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association.
  • Griffin, D.; Steen, S. (2011). "A social justice approach to school counseling". Journal for Social Action in Counseling and Psychology. 3: 74–85. doi:10.33043/JSACP.3.1.74-85.
  • Hipolito-Delgado, C. P.; Lee, C. C. (2007). "Empowerment theory for the professional school counselor: A manifesto for what really matters". Professional School Counseling. 10 (4): 327–332. doi:10.5330/prsc.10.4.fm1547261m80x744 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Lapan, R. T. (2012). "Comprehensive school counseling programs: In some schools for some students but not in all schools for all students". Professional School Counseling. 16 (2): 84–88. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2012-16.84 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Mason, E. C. M.; Ockerman, M. S.; Chen-Hayes, S. F. (2013). "Change-Agent-for-Equity (CAFE) model: A framework for school counselor identity" (PDF). Journal of School Counseling. 11: 4. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2017-08-08.
  • Ockerman, M. S., Mason, E. C. M., & Chen-Hayes, S. F. (2013). School counseling supervision in challenging times: The CAFE supervisor model. Journal of Counselor Preparation and Supervision, 5(2), Article 4. DOI:10.7729/51.0024 http://repository.wcsu.edu/jcps/vol5/iss2/4/
  • Ratts, M.; DeKruyf, L.; Chen-Hayes, S. F. (2008). "The ACA Advocacy Competencies: A social justice advocacy framework for professional school counselors". Professional School Counseling. 11 (2): 90–97. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-11.90 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Singh, A. A.; Urbano, A.; Haston, M.; McMahon, E. (2010). "School counselors' strategies for social justice change: A grounded theory of what works in the real world". Professional School Counseling. 13 (3): 135–145. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-13.135 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Smith, L.; Davis, K.; Bhowmik, M. (2010). "Youth participatory action research groups as school counseling interventions". Professional School Counseling. 14 (2): 174–182. doi:10.5330/prsc.14.2.m62r11337332gt54 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Studer, J. R. (2005). The professional school counselor: An advocate for students. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.

ASCA National Model, school counseling programs, closing gaps[edit]

  • Alberta Education, Special Education Branch (1995). From position to program: Building a comprehensive school guidance and counselling program: Planning and resource guide. Edmonton, Alberta, Canada: Author.
  • American School Counselor Association/Hatch, T. & Bowers, J. (2012). The ASCA National Model: A framework for school counseling programs, (3rd ed.) Alexandria, VA: Author.
  • Barna, J. S.; Brott, P. E. (2011). "How important is personal-social development to academic achievement? The elementary school counselor's perspective". Professional School Counseling. 14: 242–249. doi:10.5330/prsc.14.3.044367l82131qj00 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Burkhard, A. W.; Gillen, M.; Martinez, M. J.; Skytte, S. (2012). "Implementation challenges and training needs for comprehensive school counseling programs in Wisconsin high schools". Professional School Counseling. 16 (2): 136–145. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2012-16.136 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Campbell, C. A., & Dahir, C. A. (1997). Sharing the vision: The national standards for school counseling programs. Alexandria, VA: American School Counselor Association.
  • Carey, J.; Dimmitt, C. (2012). "School counseling and student outcomes: Summary of six statewide studies". Professional School Counseling. 16 (2): 146–153. doi:10.1177/2156759X0001600204. S2CID 145374780.
  • Carey, J.; Harrington, K.; Martin, I.; Hoffman, D. (2012). "A statewide evaluation of the outcomes of the implementation of ASCA National Model school counseling programs in rural and suburban Nebraska high schools". Professional School Counseling. 16 (2): 100–107. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2012-16.100 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Carey, J.; Harrington, K.; Martin, I.; Stevenson, D. (2012). "A statewide evaluation of the outcomes of the implementation of ASCA National Model school counseling programs in Utah high schools". Professional School Counseling. 16 (2): 89–99. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2012-16.89 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Chen-Hayes, S. F. (2007). "The ACCESS Questionnaire: Assessing K-12 school counseling programs and interventions to ensure equity and success for every student". Counseling and Human Development. 39: 1–10.
  • Chen-Hayes, S. F., Ockerman, M. S., & Mason, E. C. M. (2014). 101 solutions for school counselors and leaders in challenging times. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.
  • Clemens, E. V.; Carey, J. C.; Harrington, K. M. (2010). "The School Counseling Program Implementation Survey: Initial instrument development and exploratory factor analysis". Professional School Counseling. 14 (2): 125–134. doi:10.5330/prsc.14.2.k811174041n40l11 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Corbin, D. S.; McNaughton, K. (2004). "Perceived needs of educational administrators for student services offices in a Chinese context: School counselling programs addressing the needs of children and teachers". School Psychology International. 25: 373–382. doi:10.1177/0143034304046908. S2CID 143518388.
  • Dahir, C. A.; Burnham, J. J.; Stone, C. (2009). "Listen to the voices: School counselors and comprehensive school counseling programs". Professional School Counseling. 12 (3): 182–192. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-12.182 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • De Leon, Angela P., 2011. "A Model Prekindergarten through 4th Year of College (P-16) Individual Graduation Plan Proposal." Applied Research Projects, Texas State University-San Marcos. http://ecommons.txstate.edu/arp/364
  • Dimmitt, C.; Carey, J. (2007). "Using the ASCA National Model to facilitate school transitions". Professional School Counseling. 10 (3): 227–232. doi:10.5330/prsc.10.3.q0g7108523603342 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Dimmit, C.; Wilkerson, B. (2012). "Comprehensive school counseling in Rhode Island: Access to services and student outcomes". Professional School Counseling. 16 (2): 125–135. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2012-16.125 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Fezler, B., & Brown, C. (2011). The international model for school counseling programs. Pembroke Pines, FL: Association of American Schools in South America (AASSA). http://www.aassa.com/uploaded/Educational_Research/US_Department_of_State/Counseling_Standards/International_Counseling_Model_Handbook.pdf
  • Fitch, T. J.; Marshall, J. L. (2004). "What counselors do in high-achieving schools: A study on the role of the school counselor". Professional School Counseling. 7: 172–177.
  • Hartline, J.; Cobia, D. (2012). "School counselors: Closing achievement gaps and writing results reports". Professional School Counseling. 16: 71–79. doi:10.1177/2156759X1201600109. S2CID 73309086.
  • Hatch, T. (2008). Professional challenges in school counseling: Organizational, institutional and political. Journal of School Counseling, 6(22). Retrieved from [1].
  • Hatch, T. (2014). The use of data in school counseling: Hatching results for students, programs and the professions. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
  • Hatch, T., & Bowers, J. (2003, 2005, 2012). The ASCA National Model: A framework for school counseling programs. Alexandria, VA: American School Counselor Association.
  • Hatch, T.; Chen-Hayes, S. F. (2008). "School counselor beliefs about ASCA National Model school counseling program components using the SCPCS". Professional School Counseling. 12: 34–42. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-12.34 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Holcomb-McCoy, C.; Mitchell, N. (2005). "A descriptive study of urban school counseling programs". Professional School Counseling. 8: 203–209.
  • Johnson, S.; Johnson, C. D. (2003). "Results-based guidance: A systems approach to student support programs". Professional School Counseling. 6: 180–185.
  • Lapan, R. T. (2012). "Comprehensive school counseling programs: In some schools for some students but not in all schools for all students". Professional School Counseling. 16 (2): 84–88. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2012-16.84 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Carey, J.; Harrington, K.; Martin, I.; Stevenson, D. (2012). "A statewide evaluation of the outcomes of the implementation of ASCA National Model school counseling programs in Utah high schools". Professional School Counseling. 16 (2): 89–99. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2012-16.89 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Lapan, R. T. (2012). "Comprehensive school counseling programs: In some schools for some students but not in all schools for all students". Professional School Counseling. 16 (2): 84–88. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2012-16.84 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Lapan, R. T. (2001). Results-based comprehensive guidance and counseling programs: A framework for planning and evaluation. Professional School Counseling, 4 .
  • Lapan, R. T.; Gysbers, N. C.; Petroski, G. F. (2001). "Helping seventh graders be safe and successful in school: A statewide study of comprehensive guidance and counseling programs". Journal of Counseling and Development. 79: 320–330. doi:10.1002/j.1556-6676.2001.tb01977.x.
  • Lapan, R. T.; Gysbers, N. C.; Sun, Y. (1997). "The impact of more fully implemented guidance programs on the school experiences of high school students: A statewide evaluation study". Journal of Counseling and Development. 75 (4): 292–302. doi:10.1002/j.1556-6676.1997.tb02344.x.
  • Lee, V. V., & Goodnough, G. E. (2011). Systemic, data-driven school counseling practice and programming for equity. In B. T. Erford, (Ed.)., "Transforming the school counseling profession." (pp. 129–153). Boston: Pearson.
  • MacDonald, G.; Sink, C. A. (1999). "A qualitative developmental analysis of comprehensive guidance program in schools in the United States". British Journal of Guidance and Counselling. 27 (3): 415–430. doi:10.1080/03069889908256281.
  • Martin, I.; Carey, J. C. (2012). "Evaluation capacity within state-level school counseling programs: A cross-case analysis". Professional School Counseling. 15 (3): 132–143. doi:10.1177/2156759X1201500302. S2CID 220172240.
  • Martin, I.; Carey, J.; DeCoster, K. (2009). "A national study of the current status of state school counseling models". Professional School Counseling. 12 (5): 378–386. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-12.378 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Mason, E. C. M.; Ockerman, M. S.; Chen-Hayes, S. F. (2013). "Change-Agent-for-Equity (CAFE) model: A framework for school counselor identity" (PDF). Journal of School Counseling. 11: 4. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2017-08-08.
  • Nova Scotia Department of Education. (2002). Comprehensive guidance and counselling program. Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada: Author.
  • Paisley, P. O. (2001). "Maintaining and enhancing the developmental focus in school counseling programs". Professional School Counseling. 4: 271–277.
  • Perusse, R.; Goodnough, G. D. (2001). "A comparison of existing school counselor program content with the Education Trust initiatives". Counselor Education and Supervision. 41 (2): 100–110. doi:10.1002/j.1556-6978.2001.tb01274.x.
  • Perusse, R.; Goodnough, G. E.; Noel, C. J. (2001). "Use of the national standards for school counseling programs in preparing school counselors". Professional School Counseling. 5: 49–56.
  • Poynton, T. A.; Schumacher, R. A.; Wilczenski, F. L. (2008). "School counselors' attitudes regarding statewide comprehensive developmental guidance model implementation". Professional School Counseling. 11 (6): 417–422. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-11.417 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Pyne, J. R. (2011). "Comprehensive school counseling programs, job satisfaction, and the ASCA National Model". Professional School Counseling. 15 (2): 88–97. doi:10.1177/2156759X1101500202. S2CID 72760425.
  • Schellenberg, R.; Grothaus, T. (2009). "Promoting cultural responsiveness and closing the achievement gap with standards blending". Professional School Counseling. 12 (6): 440–449. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-12.440 (inactive 2024-02-07). S2CID 154178037.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Schellenberg, R (2007). "Standards blending: Aligning school counseling programs with school academic achievement missions". Virginia Counselors Journal. 29: 13–20.
  • Schwallie-Giddis, P., ter Maat, M., & Pak, M. (2003). Initiating leadership by introducing and implementing the ASCA National Model. Professional School Counseling, 6 170-17 .
  • Sink, C. A.; Stroh, H. R. (2003). "Raising achievement test scores of early elementary school students through comprehensive school counseling programs". Professional School Counseling. 6: 352–364.
  • Sink, C. A.; Akos, P.; Turnbull, R. J.; Mvududu, N. (2008). "An investigation of comprehensive school counseling programs and academic achievement in Washington State middle schools". Professional School Counseling. 12: 43–53. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-12.43 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Stevens, H.; Wilkerson, K. (2010). "The developmental assets and ASCA's National Standards: A crosswalk review". Professional School Counseling. 13 (4): 227–233. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-13.227 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Villalba, José; Akos, Patrick; Keeter, Kara; Ames, Abigail (2007). "Promoting Latino student achievement and development through the ASCA National Model". Professional School Counseling. 10 (5): 464–474. doi:10.5330/prsc.10.5.85801n6007711610 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Walsh, M. E.; Barrett, J. G.; DePaul, J. (2007). "Day-to-day activities of school counselors: Alignment with new directions in the field and the ASCA National Model". Professional School Counseling. 10 (4): 370–378. doi:10.5330/prsc.10.4.47p342040286mw72 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Young, A.; Kaffenberger, C. J. (2011). "The beliefs and practices of school counselors who use data to implement comprehensive school counseling programs". Professional School Counseling. 15 (2): 67–76. doi:10.1177/2156759X1101500204. S2CID 143978554.

Bilingual school counseling[edit]

  • Aydin, G.; Bryan, J.; Duys, D. K. (2012). "School counselors' partnerships working with linguistically diverse families: An exploratory study". The School Community Journal. 22: 145–166.
  • Bruhn, R. A., Irby, B. J., Lou, M., Thweatt, W. T. III, & Lara-Alecio, R. (2005). A model for training bilingual school counselors. In J. Tinajero and V. Gonzales (Eds.), Review of research and practice, (pp. 145–161). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.
  • Chen-Hayes, S. F., Ockerman, M. S., & Mason, E. C. M. (2014). 101 solutions for school counselors and leaders in challenging times. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.
  • Seo, M.; Sink, C. A.; Cho, H.-I. (2011). "Korean version of the Life Perspectives Inventory: Psychometric properties and implications for high school counseling". Professional School Counseling. 15: 15–33. doi:10.1177/2156759X1101500103. S2CID 260868850.
  • Shi, Q.; Steen, S. (2012). "Using the Achieving Success Everyday (ASE) Group Model to promote self-esteem and academic achievement for English as a Second Language (ESL) students". Professional School Counseling. 16: 63–70. doi:10.1177/2156759X1201600108. S2CID 143913758.
  • Smith-Adcock, S.; Daniels, M. H.; Lee, S. M.; Villalba, J. A.; Indelicato, N. A. (2006). "Culturally responsive school counseling for Hispanic/Latino students and families: The need for bilingual school counselors". Professional School Counseling. 10: 92–101. doi:10.5330/prsc.10.1.8r04h7727651174m (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)

Career and college access/admission/readiness; closing opportunity/attainment gaps[edit]

  • Auerbach, S (2002). "Why do they give the good classes to some and not to others? Latino parent narratives of struggle in a college access program". Teachers College Record. 104 (7): 1369–1392. doi:10.1111/1467-9620.00207.
  • Bryan, J.; Holcomb-McCoy, C.; Moore-Thomas, C; Day-Vines, N. L. (2009). "Who sees the school counselor for college information? A national study". Professional School Counseling. 12 (4): 280–291. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-12.280 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Bryan, J.; Moore-Thomas, C.; Day-Vines, N. L.; Holcomb-McCoy, C. (2011). "School counselors as social capital: The effects of high school college counseling on college application rates". Journal of Counseling & Development. 89 (2): 190–199. doi:10.1002/j.1556-6678.2011.tb00077.x.
  • Ceja, M (2004). "Chicana college aspirations and the role of parents: Developing educational resilience". Journal of Hispanic Higher Education. 3 (4): 338–362. doi:10.1177/1538192704268428. S2CID 145762330.
  • Chang, D. H. F. (2002). "The past, present, and future of career counseling in Taiwan". Career Development Quarterly. 50 (3): 218–225. doi:10.1002/j.2161-0045.2002.tb00897.x.
  • Chen-Hayes, S. F., Ockerman, M. S., & Mason, E. C. M. (2014). 101 solutions for school counselors and leaders in challenging times. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.
  • Chen-Hayes, S. F., Saud Maxwell, K., & Bailey, D. F. (2009). Equity-based school counseling: Ensuring career and college readiness for every student. DVD. Hanover, MA: Microtraining Associates.
  • The College Board. (2008). Inspiration & innovation: Ten effective counseling practices from the College Board's Inspiration Award schools. Washington, D.C.: Author.
  • The College Board. (2010). The college counseling sourcebook: Advice and strategies from experienced school counselors. (7th ed.). Washington, DC: Author.
  • Collins, D. E.; Weinbaum, A. T.; Ramon, G.; Vaughan, D. (2009). "Laying the groundwork: The constant gardening for postsecondary access and success". Journal of Hispanic Higher Education. 8: 394–417. doi:10.1177/1538192709347848. S2CID 145130276.
  • De Leon, Angela P., 2011. A Model Prekindergarten Through 4th Year of College (P-16) Individual Graduation Plan Proposal. Applied Research Projects, Texas State University-San Marcos. http://ecommons.txstate.edu/arp/364
  • Fallon, M. A. C. (2011). Enrollment management's sleeping giant: The net price calculator mandate. Journal of College Admissions, Spring, 6–13.
  • Fitzpatrick, C., & Costantini, K. (2011). Counseling 21st Century students for optimal college and career readiness: A 9th-12th grade curriculum. New York, NY: Routledge.
  • Gibbons, M. M.; Borders, L. D.; Wiles, M. E.; Stephan, J. B.; Davis, P. E. (2006). "Career and college planning needs of ninth graders—as reported by ninth graders". Professional School Counseling. 10 (2): 168–178. doi:10.5330/prsc.10.2.vj457656056x55w7 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Gibbons, M. M.; Borders, L. D. (2010). "A measure of college-going self-efficacy for middle school students" (PDF). Professional School Counseling. 13 (4): 234–243. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-13.234 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Hatch, T., & Bardwell, R. (2012). School counselors using data. In National Association for College Admission Counseling (Ed.), NACAC's Fundamentals of College Admission Counseling (3rd ed.). Arlington, VA: Counseling.
  • Hatch, T. (2012). School counselors: Creating a college-going culture in K-12 schools. In National Association for College Admission Counseling (Ed.), NACAC's Fundamentals of College Admission Counseling (3rd ed.). Arlington, VA: National Association for College Admission Counseling.
  • Horn, L., & Berktold, J. (1999). Students with disabilities in postsecondary education: A profile of preparation, participation, and outcomes. (National Center for Education Statistics No. 187). Washington, D. C.: United States Department of Education.
  • Hossler, D., Schmidt, J., & Vesper, N. (1998). Going to college: How social, economic, and educational factors influence the decisions students make. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.
  • Krell, M.; Perusse, R. (2012). "Providing college readiness counseling for students with Autism spectrum disorders: A Delphi study to guide school counselors". Professional School Counseling. 16: 29–39. doi:10.1177/2156759X1201600104. S2CID 72577317.
  • Lapan, R. T. (2012). "Comprehensive school counseling programs: In some schools for some students but not in all schools for all students". Professional School Counseling. 16 (2): 84–88. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2012-16.84 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Lapan, R. T.; Whitcomb, S. A.; Aleman, N. M. (2012). "Connecticut professional school counselors: College and career counseling services and smaller ratios benefit students". Professional School Counseling. 16 (2): 117–124. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2012-16.124 (inactive 2024-02-07). S2CID 53004245.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Lee, S. M.; Daniels, M. H.; Puig, A.; Newgent, R. A.; Nam, S. K. (2008). "A data-based model to predict postsecondary educational attainment of low-socioeconomic-status students". Professional School Counseling. 11 (5): 306–316. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-11.306 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Marisco, M.; Getch, Y. Q. (2009). "Transitioning Hispanic seniors from high school to college". Professional School Counseling. 12 (6): 458–462. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-12.458 (inactive 2024-02-07). S2CID 73228411.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Mason, E. C. M.; Ockerman, M. S.; Chen-Hayes, S. F. (2013). "Change-Agent-for-Equity (CAFE) model: A framework for school counselor identity" (PDF). Journal of School Counseling. 11: 4. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2017-08-08.
  • McKillip, M. E. M.; Rawls, A.; Barry, C. (2012). "Improving college access: A review of research on the role of high school counselors". Professional School Counseling. 16: 49–58. doi:10.1177/2156759X1201600106. S2CID 220203626.
  • Muhammad, C. G. (2008). "African American student and college choice: A consideration of the role of school counselors". NASSP Bulletin. 92: 81–94. doi:10.1177/0192636508320989. S2CID 145673499.
  • National Association of College Admission Counseling. (2008). Fundamentals of college admission counseling (2d ed.). Dubuque, IA: Kendall-Hunt.
  • Ohrt, J. H.; Lambie, G. W.; Ieva, K. P. (2009). "Supporting Latino and African-American students in Advanced Placement courses: A school counseling program's approach". Professional School Counseling. 13: 59–63. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-13.59 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Oliva, M (2004). "Reluctant partners, problem definition, and legislative intent: P-20 policy for Latino college success". Journal of Hispanic Higher Education. 3 (2): 209–230. doi:10.1177/1538192704263574. S2CID 143639425.
  • Perna, L.; Rowan-Kenyon, H.; Thomas, S.; Bell, A.; Anderson, R.; Li, C. (2008). "The role of college counseling in shaping college opportunity: Variations across high schools". Review of Higher Education. 31 (2): 131–159. doi:10.1353/rhe.2007.0073. S2CID 143920041.
  • Perna, L; Titus, M. A. (2005). "The relationship between parental involvement as social capital and college enrollment: An examination of racial/ethnic group differences". Journal of Higher Education. 76 (5): 485–518. doi:10.1353/jhe.2005.0036. S2CID 32290790.
  • Sciarra, D. T.; Ambrosino, K. E. (2011). "Post-secondary expectations and educational attainment". Professional School Counseling. 14: 231–241. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2011-14.231 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Sciarra, D. T.; Whitson, M. L. (2007). "Predictive factors in postsecondary educational attainment among Latinos". Professional School Counseling. 10 (3): 307–316. doi:10.5330/prsc.10.3.e354r3u2572t5401 (inactive 2024-02-07). S2CID 11982254.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Smith, W. L.; Zhang, P. (2009). "Students' perceptions and experiences with key factors during the transition from high school to college". College Student Journal. 43: 643–657.
  • Stage, F.; Hossler, D. (1989). "Differences in family influences on college attendance plans for male and female ninth graders". Research in Higher Education. 30 (3): 301–314. doi:10.1007/bf00992606. S2CID 68892468.
  • Tang, M.; Pan, W.; Newmeyer, M. (2008). "Factors influencing high school students' career aspirations". Professional School Counseling. 11 (5): 285–295. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-11.285 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Torrez, N (2004). "Developing parent information frameworks that support college preparation for Latino students". The High School Journal. 87 (3): 54–59. doi:10.1353/hsj.2004.0006. S2CID 55084811.
  • Trusty, J.; Niles, S. G. (2004). "Realized potential or lost talent: High school variables and bachelor's degree completion". Career Development Quarterly. 53: 2–15. doi:10.1002/j.2161-0045.2004.tb00651.x.
  • Trusty, J.; Niles, S. G. (2003). "High-school math courses and completion of the bachelor's degree". Professional School Counseling. 7: 99–107.
  • Turner, S. L.; Ziebell, J. L. C. (2011). "The career beliefs of inner-city adolescents". Professional School Counseling. 15: 1–14. doi:10.1177/2156759X1101500104. S2CID 145792116.

Caseloads, collaboration, resources, schedule changes, school counselor/student ratios[edit]

  • Akos, P.; Schuldt, H.; Walendin, M. (2009). "School counselor assignment in secondary schools". Professional School Counseling. 13: 23–29. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-13.23 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Chen-Hayes, S. F., Ockerman, M. S., & Mason, E. C. M. (2014). 101 solutions for school counselors and leaders in challenging times. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.
  • Griffin, D.; Farris, A. (2010). "School counselors and collaboration: Finding resources through community asset mapping". Professional School Counseling. 13 (5): 248–256. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-13.248 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Lapan, R. T. (2012). "Comprehensive school counseling programs: In some schools for some students but not in all schools for all students". Professional School Counseling. 16 (2): 84–88. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2012-16.84 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Lapan, R. T.; Gysbers, N. C.; Bragg, S.; Pierce, M. E. (2012). "Missouri professional school counselors: Ratios matter, especially in high-poverty schools". Professional School Counseling. 16: 117–124. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2012-16.124 (inactive 2024-02-07). S2CID 53004245.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Lapan, R. T.; Whitcomb, S. A.; Aleman, N. M. (2012). "Connecticut professional school counselors: College and career counseling services and smaller ratios benefit students". Professional School Counseling. 16 (2): 117–124. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2012-16.124 (inactive 2024-02-07). S2CID 53004245.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • McCarthy, C.; Kerne, V. V. H.; Calfa, N. A.; Lambert, R. G.; Guzman, M. (2010). "An exploration of school counselors' demands and resources: Relationship to stress, biographic, and caseload characteristics". Professional School Counseling. 13 (3): 146–158. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-13.146 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Portman, T.; Wood, S. M.; Viviani, A. (2011). "Secondary student schedule changes: Accountability issues in school counseling program management". Journal of Counseling Research and Practice. 2: 20–25. doi:10.56702/UCKX8598/jcrp0201.5.

Counseling theories in schools[edit]

  • Henderson, D. A. & Thompson, C. L. (2010). Counseling children. New York: Brooks/Cole/Cengage.
  • Lemberger, M. E.; Nash, E. R. (2008). "School counselors and the influence of Adler: Individual psychology since the advent of the ASCA National Model". Journal of Individual Psychology. 64: 386–402.
  • Lemberger, M. E. (2010). "Advocating student-within-environment: A humanistic theory for school counseling". The Journal of Humanistic Counseling, Education and Development. 49 (2): 131–146. doi:10.1002/j.2161-1939.2010.tb00093.x.
  • Perusse, R., and Goodnough, G. E., (Eds.). (2004). Leadership, advocacy, and direct service strategies for professional school counselors. Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole/Cengage.
  • Shen, Y.; Herr, E. L. (2003). "Perceptions of play therapy in Taiwan: The voices of school counselors and school counselor educators". International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling. 25: 27–41. doi:10.1023/A:1024924111194. S2CID 140433782.
  • Sklare, G. B. (2014). Brief counseling that works: A solution-focused therapy approach for school counselors and other mental health professionals (3rd ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
  • Winslade, J. M., & Monk G. D. (2007). Narrative counseling in schools: Powerful and brief (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

Credentialing exams for school counselors[edit]

  • Schellenberg, R. (2012). The school counselor’s study guide for credentialing exams. New York: Routledge.

Cultural competence, ethnic/racial identity development in schools[edit]

  • Buser, J. K. (2010). "American Indian adolescents and disordered eating". Professional School Counseling. 14 (2): 146–155. doi:10.5330/prsc.14.2.k8v1wu5nj23x1492 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Chen-Hayes, S. F., Ockerman, M. S., & Mason, E. C. M. (2014). 101 solutions for school counselors and leaders in challenging times. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.
  • Day-Vines, N. L.; Day-Hairston, B. O. (2005). "Culturally congruent strategies for addressing the behavioral needs of urban African-American male adolescents". Professional School Counseling. 8: 236–243.
  • Day-Vines, N.; Patton, J.; Baytops, J. (2003). "African American adolescents: The impact of race and middle class status on the counseling process". Professional School Counseling. 7: 40–51.
  • Holcomb-McCoy, C. & Chen-Hayes, S. F. (2011). Culturally competent school counselors: Affirming diversity by challenging oppression. In B. T. Erford, (Ed). Transforming the school counseling profession. (3rd ed). (pp. 90–109). Boston: Pearson.
  • Malott, K. M.; Alessandria, K. P.; Kirkpatrick, M.; Carandang, J. (2009). "Ethnic labeling in Mexican-origin youth: A qualitative assessment". Professional School Counseling. 12 (5): 352–364. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-12.352 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Maxwell, M. J.; Henriksen, R. C. (2012). "Counseling multiple heritage adolescents: A phenomenological study of experiences and practices of middle school counselors". Professional School Counseling. 16: 18–28. doi:10.1177/2156759X1201600103. S2CID 220201251.
  • Portman, T. A. A. (2009). "Faces of the future: School counselors as cultural mediators". Journal of Counseling & Development. 87: 21–27. doi:10.1002/j.1556-6678.2009.tb00545.x.
  • Schellenberg, R.; Grothaus, T. (2009). "Promoting cultural responsiveness and closing the achievement gap with standards blending". Professional School Counseling. 12 (6): 440–449. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-12.440 (inactive 2024-02-07). S2CID 154178037.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Shen, Y.-J.; Lowing, R. J. (2007). "School counselors' self-perceived Asian American counseling competence". Professional School Counseling. 11: 69–71. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-11.69 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Shin, R. Q.; Daly, B. P.; Vera, E. M. (2007). "The relationships of peer norms, ethnic identity, and peer support to school engagement in urban youth". Professional School Counseling. 10 (4): 379–388. doi:10.5330/prsc.10.4.l0157553k063x29u (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Suh, S.; Satcher, J. (2005). "Understanding at-risk Korean American youth". Professional School Counseling. 8: 428–435.
  • Trusty, J (2002). "African Americans' educational expectations: Longitudinal causal models for women and men". Journal of Counseling & Development. 80 (3): 332–345. doi:10.1002/j.1556-6678.2002.tb00198.x.
  • Turner, S. L.; Conkel, J. L.; Reich, A. N.; Trotter, M. J.; Slewart, J. J. (2006). "Social skills efficacy and proactivity among Native American adolescents". Professional School Counseling. 10 (2): 189–194. doi:10.5330/prsc.10.2.w26uw470745v0815 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Vera, E. M.; Vacek, K.; Coyle, L. D.; Stinson, J.; Mull, M.; Buchheit, C.; Gorman, C.; Hewitt, A.; Keene, C.; Blackmon, S.; Langrehr, K. J. (2011). "An examination of culturally relevant stressors, coping, ethnic identity, and subjective well-being in urban ethnic minority adolescents". Professional School Counseling. 15 (2): 55–66. doi:10.1177/2156759X1101500203. S2CID 145212331.
  • Wyatt, S (2009). "The brotherhood: Empowering adolescent African-American males toward excellence". Professional School Counseling. 12 (6): 463–470. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-12.463 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)

Counseling core curriculum, lesson plans, classroom management[edit]

  • Fitzpatrick, C., & Costantini, K. (2011). Counseling 21st Century students for optimal college and career readiness: A 9th-12th grade curriculum. New York, NY: Routledge.
  • Geltner, J. A.; Clark, M. A. (2005). "Engaging students in classroom guidance: Management strategies for middle school counselors". Professional School Counseling. 9 (2): 164–166. doi:10.5330/prsc.9.2.ep275j6064637461 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Geltner, J. A.; Cunningham, T. J.; Caldwell, C. D. (2011). "Identifying curriculum components for classroom management training for school counselors: A Delphi study". Journal of Counselor Preparation and Supervision. 3: 82–94.
  • Goodnough, G. E., Perusse, R., & Erford, B. T. (2011). Developmental classroom guidance. In B. T. Erford, (Ed.)., Transforming the school counseling profession (3rd ed.). (pp. 154–177). Boston: Pearson.
  • Perusse, R., & Goodnough, G. E., (Eds.). (2004). Leadership, advocacy, and direct service strategies for professional school counselors. Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole.
  • Villares, E., Brigman, G., & Maier, A. (2010). Student Success Skills: Building quality worlds and advocating for school counseling programs. International Journal of Choice Theory and Reality Therapy, 1.
  • Villares, E.; Brigman, G.; Peluso, P. (2008). "Ready to Learn: An evidence-based Individual Psychology-linked curriculum for prekindergarten through first grade". Journal of Individual Psychology. 64: 386–402.
  • Villares, E., Frain, M., Brigman, G., Webb, L., & Peluso, P. (2012). The impact of Student Success Skills on standardized test scores: A meta-analysis Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation,doi 2150137811434041
  • Villares, E.; Lemberger, M.; Brigman, G. (2011). "Student Success Skills: An evidence-based school counseling program grounded in humanistic theory". Journal of Humanistic Counseling, Education and Development. 50: 1.
  • Webb, L.; Lemberger, M.; Brigman, G. (2008). "Student Success Skills: A review of a research-based school counselor intervention influenced by Individual Psychology". Journal of Individual Psychology. 64: 339–352.

Ethics and law in school counseling[edit]

  • Lapan, R. T. (2012). "Comprehensive school counseling programs: In some schools for some students but not in all schools for all students". Professional School Counseling. 16 (2): 84–88. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2012-16.84 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Moyer, M. S.; Sullivan, J. R.; Growcock, D. (2012). "When is it ethical to inform administrators about student risk-taking behaviors? Perceptions of school counselors". Professional School Counseling. 15 (3): 98–109. doi:10.1177/2156759X1201500303. S2CID 4648477.
  • Moyer, M. S.; Sullivan, J. R. (2008). "Student risk-taking behaviors: When do school counselors break confidentiality?". Professional School Counseling. 11 (4): 236–245. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-11.236 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Stone, C. B.; Zirkel, P. A. (2010). "School counselor advocacy: When law and ethics may collide". Professional School Counseling. 13 (4): 244–247. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-13.244 (inactive 2024-02-07). S2CID 153652095.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Stone, C. B. (2005). School counseling principles: Ethics and law. Alexandria, VA: American School Counselor Association.

Gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender school counseling[edit]

  • Bidell, M. P. (2005). "The Sexual Orientation Counselor Competency Scale: Assessing attitudes, skills, and knowledge of counselors working with lesbian/gay/bisexual clients". Counselor Education and Supervision. 44: 267–279. doi:10.1002/j.1556-6978.2005.tb01755.x.
  • Chen-Hayes, S. F. (2012). Counseling and advocacy with a gay father, a straight mom, and a transgender adolescent. In S. H. Dworkin & M. Pope, (Eds.)., Casebook for counseling lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender persons and their families (pp. 45–52). Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association.
  • Chen-Hayes, S. F. (2001). "Counseling and advocacy with transgendered and gender-variant persons in schools and families". Journal of Humanistic Counseling, Education and Development. 40: 34–48. doi:10.1002/j.2164-490x.2001.tb00100.x.
  • Chen-Hayes, S. F., & Haley-Banez, L. (2000). Lesbian, bisexual, gay, and transgendered counseling in schools and families (1, 2). DVDs. Hanover, MA: Microtraining Associates.
  • Chen-Hayes, S. F., Ockerman, M. S., & Mason, E. C. M. (2014). 101 solutions for school counselors and leaders in challenging times. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.
  • Depaul, J.; Walsh, M.; Dam, U. C. (2009). "The role of school counselors in addressing sexual orientation in schools". Professional School Counseling. 12 (4): 300–308. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-12.300 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Fisher, E. S., & Komosa-Hawkins, K., (Eds.). (2013). Creating safe and supportive learning environments: A guide for working with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning youth and families. New York: Routledge.
  • Goodrich, K. M.; Luke, M. (2011). "The LGBTQ Responsive Model for Group Supervision of Group Work. Journal". For Specialists in Group Work. 36 (1): 22–39. doi:10.1080/01933922.2010.537739. S2CID 145790273.
  • Goodrich, K. M.; Luke, M. (2010). "The experiences of school counselors-in-training in group work with LGBTQ adolescents". Journal for Specialists in Group Work. 35 (2): 143–159. doi:10.1080/01933921003705966. S2CID 144175044.
  • Goodrich, K. M.; Luke, M. (2009). "LGBTQ responsive school counseling". Journal of LGBT Issues in Counseling. 3 (2): 113–127. doi:10.1080/15538600903005284. S2CID 143134758.
  • Luke, M.; Goodrich, K. M.; Scarborough, J. L. (2011). "Integration of K-12 LGBTQI student population into school counselor education curricula: The current state of affairs". The Journal of LGBT Issues in Counseling. 5 (2): 80–101. doi:10.1080/15538605.2011.574530. S2CID 144335679.
  • McFarland, W. P. (2001). "The legal duty to protect gay and lesbian students from violence in school". Professional School Counseling. 4: 171–179.
  • Ryan, C., & Chen-Hayes, S. F. (2013). Educating and empowering families of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning students. In E. S. Fisher & K. Komosa-Hawkins, (Eds.)., Creating safe and supportive learning environments: A guide for working with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning youth and families (pp. 209–229). New York: Routledge.
  • Satcher, J.; Leggett, M. (2007). "Homonegativity among professional school counselors: An exploratory study". Professional School Counseling. 11: 10–16. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-11.10 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Satcher, J.; Leggett, M. (2005). "What to say when your student may be gay? A primer for school counselors". Alabama Counseling Association Journal. 31: 44–52.
  • Smith, S. D., & Chen-Hayes, S. F. (2004). Leadership and advocacy strategies for lesbian, bisexual, gay, transgendered, and questioning (LBGTQ) students: Academic, career, and interpersonal success. In R. Perusse and G. E. Goodnough (Eds.), Leadership, advocacy, and direct service strategies for professional school counselors (pp. 187–221). Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole/Cengage.
  • Varjas, K.; Graybill, E.; Mahan, W.; Dew, B.; Marshall, M.; Singh, A. (2007). "Urban service providers' perspectives on school responses to gay, lesbian, and questioning students: An exploratory study". Professional School Counseling. 11 (2): 113–119. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-11.113 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Whitman, J. S.; Horn, S. S.; Boyd, C. J. (2007). "Activism in the schools: Providing LGBTQ affirmative training to school counselors". Journal of Gay & Lesbian Mental Health. 11 (3): 143–154. doi:10.1080/19359705.2007.9962487.

Group counseling in schools[edit]

  • Brigman, G., & Early, B. (2001). Group counseling for school counselors: A practical guide. Portland, ME: Walch.
  • Paisley, P.; Milsom, A. (2007). "Group work as an essential contribution to transforming school counseling". Journal for Specialists in Group Work. 32: 9–17. doi:10.1080/01933920600977465. S2CID 143260929.
  • Steen, S.; Bauman, S.; Smith, J. (2007). "Professional school counselors and the practice of group work". Professional School Counseling. 11 (2): 72–80. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-11.72 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Steen, S.; Kaffenberger, C. J. (2007). "Integrating academic interventions into small group counseling in elementary school". Professional School Counseling. 10 (5): 516–519. doi:10.5330/prsc.10.5.u4023v1n8402337v (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)

International school counseling[edit]

American school counseling for developing a Korean school counseling model. Korean Journal of Counseling Psychology, 19, 539–567.

Leadership, systemic change, principal perceptions of school counseling[edit]

  • Amatea, E.; Clark, M. (2005). "Changing schools, changing counselors: A qualitative study of school administrators' conceptions of the school counselor role". Professional School Counseling. 9: 16–27. doi:10.5330/prsc.9.1.w6357vn62n5328vp (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Beesley, D.; Frey, L. L. (2001). "Principals' perceptions of school counselor roles and satisfaction with school counseling services". Journal of School Counseling. 4: 1–27.
  • Bemak, F (2000). "Transforming the role of the counselor to provide leadership in educational reform through collaboration". Professional School Counseling. 3: 323–331.
  • Chata, C. C.; Loesch, L. C. (2007). "Future school principals' views of the role of professional school counselors". Professional School Counseling. 11: 35–41. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-11.35 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Chen-Hayes, S. F., Miller, E. M., Bailey, D. F., Getch, Y. Q., & Erford, B. T. (2011). Leadership and achievement advocacy for every student. In B. T. Erford, (Ed)., Transforming the school counseling profession (3rd ed.) (pp. 110–128). Boston, MA: Pearson.
  • Chen-Hayes, S. F., Ockerman, M. S., & Mason, E. C. M. (2014). 101 solutions for school counselors and leaders in challenging times. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.
  • Clark, M.; Stone, C. (2001). "School counselors and principals: Partners in support of academic achievement". National Association of Secondary Principals Bulletin. 85: 46–53.
  • Clemens, E. V.; Milsom, A.; Cashwell, C. S. (2009). "Using leader-member exchange theory to examine principal-school counselor relationships, school counselors' roles, job satisfaction and turnover intentions" (PDF). Professional School Counseling. 13 (2): 75–85. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-13.75 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Curry, J. R.; Bickmore, D. (2012). "School counselor induction and the importance of mattering". Professional School Counseling. 15 (3): 110–122. doi:10.1177/2156759X1201500301. S2CID 220183306.
  • Curry, J. R.; DeVoss, J. A. (2009). "Introduction to special issue: The school counselor as leader". Professional School Counseling. 13 (2): 64–67. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-13.64 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Dahir, C (2004). "Supporting a nation of learners: The role of school counseling in educational reform". Journal of Counseling and Development. 82 (3): 344–364. doi:10.1002/j.1556-6678.2004.tb00320.x.
  • Devoss, J. A., & Andrews, M. F. (2006). School counselors as educational leaders. Boston, MA: Houghton-Mifflin.
  • Dollarhide, C. T.; Gibson, D. M.; Saginak, K. A. (2008). "New counselors' leadership efforts in school counseling: Themes from a year-long qualitative study". Professional School Counseling. 11 (4): 262–271. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-11.262 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Dollarhide, C. T.; Smith, A. T.; Lemberger, M. E. (2007). "Critical incidents in the development of supportive principals: Facilitating school counselor-principal relationships". Professional School Counseling. 10 (4): 360–369. doi:10.5330/prsc.10.4.k111116677917913 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Dodson, T (2009). "Advocacy and impact: A comparison of administrators' perceptions of the high school counselor role". Professional School Counseling. 12 (6): 480–487. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-12.480 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Ford, A.; Nelson, J. (2007). "Secondary school counselors as educational leaders: Shifting perceptions of leadership". Journal of School Counseling. 5: 1–27.
  • Gysbers, N. C. (2006). "Improving school guidance and counseling practices through effective and sustained state leadership: A response to Miller". Professional School Counseling. 9: 245–247. doi:10.5330/prsc.9.3.004x155281785588 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Hatch, T (2008). "Professional challenges in school counseling: Organizational, institutional and political" (PDF). Journal of School Counseling. 6 (22). Archived from the original (PDF) on July 29, 2021.
  • Herr, E. L. (2001). "The impact of national policies, economics, and school reform on comprehensive guidance programs". Professional School Counseling. 4: 236–245.
  • Janson, C (2009). "High school counselors' views of their leadership behaviors: A Q methodology study". Professional School Counseling. 13 (2): 86–97. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-13.86 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Janson, C.; Militello, M.; Kosine, N. (2008). "Four views of the professional school counselor and principal relationship: A Q methodology study". Professional School Counseling. 11 (6): 353–361. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-11.353 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Janson, C.; Stone, C.; Clark, M. A. (2009). "Stretching leadership: A distributed perspective for school counselor leaders". Professional School Counseling. 13 (2): 98–106. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-13.98 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Johnson, J., Rochkind, J., Ott, A., & DuPont, S. (2010). Can I get a little advice here? How an overstretched high school guidance system is undermining students' college aspirations. San Francisco: Public Agenda.
  • Kaplan, L. S. (1999). "Hiring the best school counseling candidates to promote student achievement". NASSP Bulletin. 83 (603): 34–39. doi:10.1177/019263659908360306. S2CID 145258587.
  • Keys, S. G.; Lockhart, E. (2000). "The school counselor's role in facilitating multisystemic change". Professional School Counseling. 3: 101–107.
  • Kirchner, G.; Setchfield, M. (2005). "School counselors' and school principals' perceptions of the school counselor's role". Education. 126: 10–16.
  • Lapan, R. T. (2012). "Comprehensive school counseling programs: In some schools for some students but not in all schools for all students". Professional School Counseling. 16 (2): 84–88. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2012-16.84 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Leuwerke, W. C.; Walker, J.; Shi, Q. (2009). "Informing principals: The impact of different types of information on principals' perceptions of professional school counselors". Professional School Counseling. 12 (4): 263–271. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-12.263 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Mason, E. C. M.; McMahon, H. G. (2009). "Leadership practices of school counselors". Professional School Counseling. 13 (2): 107–115. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-13.107 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Mason, E. C. M.; Ockerman, M. S.; Chen-Hayes, S. F. (2013). "Change-Agent-for-Equity (CAFE) model: A framework for school counselor identity" (PDF). Journal of School Counseling. 11: 4. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2017-08-08.
  • McMahon, H. G.; Mason, E. C. M.; Paisley, P. O. (2009). "School counselor educators as educational leaders promoting systemic change". Professional School Counseling. 13 (2): 116–124. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-13.116 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Perusse, R.; Goodnough, G. D.; Donegan, J.; Jones, C. (2004). "Perceptions of school counselors and school principals about the National Standards for School Counseling programs and the Transforming School Counseling Initiative". Professional School Counseling. 7: 152–161.
  • Reynolds, S. E., & Hines, P. L. (2001). Guiding all kids: Systemic guidance for achievement in schools. (2nd ed.). Bloomington, IN: American Student Achievement Institute.
  • Reynolds, S. E., & Hines, P. L. (2001). Vision-to-action: A step-by-step activity guide for systemic educational reform. (6th ed.). Bloomington, IN: American Student Achievement Institute.
  • Ross, D.; Herrington, D. (2006). "A comparative study of pre-professional counselor/principal perceptions of the role of the school counselor in public schools". National Forum of Educational Administration and Supervision Journal. 23: 1–18.
  • Ryan, T.; Kaffenberger, C. J.; Carroll, A. G. (2011). "Response to intervention: An opportunity for school counselor leadership". Professional School Counseling. 14: 211–221. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2011-14.211 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Saginak, K. A.; Dollarhide, C. T. (2006). "Leadership with administration: Securing administrative support for transforming your program". Journal of School Counseling. 4: 1–19.
  • Shillingford, M. A.; Lambie, G. W. (2010). "Contribution of professional school counselors' values and leadership practices to their programmatic service delivery". Professional School Counseling. 13 (4): 208–217. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-13.208 (inactive 2024-02-07). S2CID 56589822.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Zalaquett, C. P. (2005). "Principals' perceptions of elementary school counselors' role and function". Professional School Counseling. 8: 451–457.

Outcome research in school counseling[edit]

  • Brooks-McNamara, V., & Torres, D. (2008). The reflective school counselor's guide to practitioner research: Skills and strategies for successful inquiry. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
  • Bryan, J. A.; Day-Vines, N. L.; Holcomb-McCoy, C.; Moore-Thomas, C. (2010). "Using national education longitudinal data sets in school counseling research". Counselor Education and Supervision. 49 (4): 266–279. doi:10.1002/j.1556-6978.2010.tb00102.x.
  • Carey, J.; Dimmitt, C. (2012). "School counseling and student outcomes: Summary of six statewide studies". Professional School Counseling. 16 (2): 146–153. doi:10.1177/2156759X0001600204. S2CID 145374780.
  • Carey, J.; Harrington, K.; Martin, I.; Hoffman, D. (2012). "A statewide evaluation of the outcomes of the implementation of ASCA National Model school counseling programs in rural and suburban Nebraska high schools". Professional School Counseling. 16 (2): 100–107. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2012-16.100 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Carey, J.; Harrington, K.; Martin, I.; Stevenson, D. (2012). "A statewide evaluation of the outcomes of the implementation of ASCA National Model school counseling programs in Utah high schools". Professional School Counseling. 16 (2): 89–99. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2012-16.89 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Clark, M. A.; Thompson, P.; Vialle, W. (2008). "Examining the gender gap in educational outcomes in public education: Involving pre-service school counsellors and teachers in cross-cultural and interdisciplinary research". International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling. 30: 52–66. doi:10.1007/s10447-007-9044-7. S2CID 73593967.
  • Dimmitt, C.; Carey, J. C.; McGannon, W.; Henningson, I. (2005). "Identifying a school counseling research agenda: A Delphi study". Counselor Education & Supervision. 44 (3): 215–228. doi:10.1002/j.1556-6978.2005.tb01748.x.
  • Dimmit, C.; Wilkerson, B. (2012). "Comprehensive school counseling in Rhode Island: Access to services and student outcomes". Professional School Counseling. 16 (2): 125–135. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2012-16.125 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Falco, L. D.; Bauman, S.; Sumnicht, Z.; Engelstad, A. (2011). "Content analysis of the Professional School Counseling journal: The first ten years". Professional School Counseling. 14 (4): 271–277. doi:10.1177/2156759X1101400403. S2CID 220169915.
  • Foster, L. H.; Watson, T. S.; Meeks, C.; Young, J. S. (2002). "Single-subject research design for school counselors: Becoming an applied researcher". Professional School Counseling. 6: 146–159.
  • Kaffenberger, C.; Davis, T. (2009). "Introduction to special issue: A call for practitioner research". Professional School Counseling. 12 (6): 392–394. doi:10.5330/psc.s.2010-12.392 (inactive 2024-02-07). S2CID 143523537.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Lapan, R. T. (2012). "Comprehensive school counseling programs: In some schools for some students but not in all schools for all students". Professional School Counseling. 16 (2): 84–88. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2012-16.84 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Lapan, R. T., Whitcomb, S. A., & Aleman, N. M. (2012). Connecticut professional school counselors: College and career counseling services and smaller ratios benefit students. " Professional School Counseling 16," 117–124.
  • Lapan, R. T.; Gysbers, N. C.; Bragg, S.; Pierce, M. E. (2012). "Missouri professional school counselors: Ratios matter, especially in high-poverty schools". Professional School Counseling. 16: 117–124. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2012-16.124 (inactive 2024-02-07). S2CID 53004245.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Rowell, L. L. (2006). "Action research and school counseling: Closing the gap between research and practice". Professional School Counseling. 9 (4): 376–384. doi:10.5330/prsc.9.4.g777740821404674 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Whiston, S. C.; Tai, W. L.; Rahardja, D.; Eder, K. (2011). "School counseling outcome: A meta-analytic examination of interventions". Journal of Counseling & Development. 89: 37–55. doi:10.1002/j.1556-6678.2011.tb00059.x.
  • Whiston, S. C.; Sexton, T. L. (1998). "A review of school counseling outcome research: Implications for practice". Journal of Counseling & Development. 76 (4): 412–426. doi:10.1002/j.1556-6676.1998.tb02700.x.

Personal/social interventions: abuse, addictions, anxiety, bullying, conflict, obesity, peer mediation, self-mutilation, violence[edit]

  • Barrett, K. M.; Lester, S. V.; Durham, J. C. (2011). "Child maltreatment and the advocacy role of professional school counselors". Journal for Social Action in Counseling and Psychology. 3 (2): 86–103. doi:10.33043/JSACP.3.2.86-103.
  • Burrow-Sanchez, J. J.; Call, M. E.; Zheng, R.; Drew, C. J. (2011). "How school counselors can help prevent online victimization". Journal of Counseling & Development. 89: 3–10. doi:10.1002/j.1556-6678.2011.tb00055.x.
  • Carney, J. V. (2008). Perceptions of bullying and associate trauma during adolescence. Professional School Counseling, 11, 179–188.
  • Chen-Hayes, S. F., Ockerman, M. S., & Mason, E. C. M. (2014). 101 solutions for school counselors and leaders in challenging times. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.
  • Chibbaro, J. S. (2007). "School counselors and the cyberbully: Interventions and implications". Professional School Counseling. 11: 65–68. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-11.65 (inactive 2024-02-07). S2CID 145637592.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Cook, A. L.; Hayden, L. A. (2012). "Obesity prevention among Latino youth: School counselors' role in promoting healthy lifestyles". Professional School Counseling. 16: 7–17. doi:10.1177/2156759X1201600102. S2CID 220190488.
  • Curtis, R., Van Horne, J. W., Robertson, P., & Karvonen, M. (2010). Outcomes of a school-wide positive behavioral support program. Professional School Counseling, 13 159–164.
  • Hagedorn, W. B.; Young, T. (2011). "Identifying and intervening with students exhibiting signs of gaming addiction and other addictive behaviors: Implications for professional school counselors". Professional School Counseling. 14 (4): 261–270. doi:10.1177/2156759X1101400401. S2CID 220156988.
  • Lambie, G (2005). "Child abuse and neglect: A practical guide for professional school counselors". Professional School Counseling. 8: 249–258.
  • McAdams, C. R.; Schmidt, C. D. (2007). "How to help a bully: Recommendations for counseling the proactive aggressor". Professional School Counseling. 11 (2): 120–128. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-11.120 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Moyer, M. S.; Nelson, K. W. (2007). "Investigating and understanding self-mutilation: The student voice". Professional School Counseling. 11: 42–48. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-11.42 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Phillips, V. I.; Cornell, D. G. (2012). "Identifying victims of bullying: Use of counselor interviews to confirm peer nominations". Professional School Counseling. 15 (3): 123–131. doi:10.1177/2156759X1201500304. S2CID 54088708.
  • Rose, H.; Miller, L; Martinez, Y. (2009). "FRIENDS for Life": The results of a resilience-building, anxiety-prevention program in a Canadian elementary school". Professional School Counseling. 12 (6): 400–407. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-12.400 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Schellenberg, R.; Parks-Savage, A.; Rehfuss, M. (2007). "Reducing levels of elementary school violence with peer mediation". Professional School Counseling. 10 (5): 475–481. doi:10.5330/prsc.10.5.q7866077l3v5q044 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Vera, E. M.; Shin, R. Q.; Montgomery, G.; Mildner, C.; Speight, S. L (2004). "Conflict resolution, self-efficacy, self-control, and future orientation of urban adolescents". Professional School Counseling. 8: 73–80.
  • Walley, C. T., & Grothaus, T. (2013). A qualitative examination of school counselors’ training to recognize and respond to adolescent mental health issues Journal of School Counseling 11(11). Retrieved from [3]
  • Young, A.; Hardy, V.; Hamilton, C.; Biernesser, K.; Sun, L-L; Niebergall, S. (2009). "Empowering students: Using data to transform a bullying prevention and intervention program". Professional School Counseling. 12 (6): 413–420. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-12.413 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)

Poverty, homelessness, classism[edit]

  • Amatea, E. S.; West-Olatunji, C. A. (2007). "Joining the conversation about educating our poorest children: Emerging leadership roles for school counselors in high-poverty schools". Professional School Counseling. 11 (2): 81–89. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-11.81 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Gizir, C. A.; Aydin, G. (2009). "Protective factors contributing to the academic resilience of students living in poverty in Turkey". Professional School Counseling. 13: 38–49. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-13.38 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Grothaus, T.; Lorelle, S.; Anderson, K.; Knight, J. (2011). "Answering the call: Facilitating responsive services for students experiencing homelessness". Professional School Counseling. 14: 191–201. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2011-14.191 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Lapan, R. T. (2012). "Comprehensive school counseling programs: In some schools for some students but not in all schools for all students". Professional School Counseling. 16 (2): 84–88. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2012-16.84 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Lapan, R. T.; Gysbers, N. C.; Bragg, S.; Pierce, M. E. (2012). "Missouri professional school counselors: Ratios matter, especially in high-poverty schools". Professional School Counseling. 16: 117–124. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2012-16.124 (inactive 2024-02-07). S2CID 53004245.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Van Velsor, P.; Orozco, G. L. (2007). "Involving low-income parents in the schools: Communitycentric strategies for school counselors". Professional School Counseling. 11: 17–24. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-11.17 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)

Rural school counseling[edit]

  • Carey, J.; Harrington, K.; Martin, I.; Hoffman, D. (2012). "A statewide evaluation of the outcomes of the implementation of ASCA National Model school counseling programs in rural and suburban Nebraska high schools". Professional School Counseling. 16 (2): 100–107. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2012-16.100 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Griffen, D.; Hutchins, B. C.; Meece, J. L. (2011). "Where do rural high school students go to find information about their futures?". Journal of Counseling & Development. 89 (2): 172–181. doi:10.1002/j.1556-6678.2011.tb00075.x.
  • Montero-Leitner, J.; Asner-Self, K. K.; Milde, C.; Leitner, D. W.; Skelton, D. (2006). "The role of the rural school counselor: Counselor, counselor-in-training, and principal perceptions". Professional School Counseling. 9 (3): 248–251. doi:10.5330/prsc.9.3.g108486473q49kh1 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Sutton, J. M.; Pearson, R. (2002). "The practice of school counseling in rural and small town high schools". Professional School Counseling. 5: 266–276.

School-family-community partnerships; parenting interventions for academic success[edit]

  • Aydin, G.; Bryan, J.; Duys, D. K. (2012). "School counselors' partnerships working with linguistically diverse families: An exploratory study". The School Community Journal. 22: 145–166.
  • Bailey, D. F.; Bradbury-Bailey, M. E. (2010). "Empowered youth programs: Partnerships for enhancing postsecondary outcomes of African American adolescents". Professional School Counseling. 14: 64–74. doi:10.5330/prsc.14.1.0vk554458027081n (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Bryan, J (2005). "Fostering educational resilience and academic achievement in urban schools through school-family-community partnerships". Professional School Counseling. 8: 219–227.
  • Bryan, J. A.; Griffin, D. (2010). "A multidimensional study of school-family-community partnership involvement: School, school counselor, and training factors". Professional School Counseling. 14: 75–86. doi:10.5330/prsc.14.1.q447832251421482 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Bryan, J.; Henry, L. (2008). "Strengths-based partnerships: A school-family-community partnership approach to empowering students". Professional School Counseling. 12 (2): 149–156. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-12.149 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Bryan, J., & Holcomb-McCoy, C. (2010). Collaboration and partnerships with families and communities. Professional School Counseling, 14 ii-v.
  • Bryan, J.; Holcomb-McCoy, C. (2004). "School counselors' perceptions of their involvement in school family community partnerships". Professional School Counseling. 7: 162–171.
  • Chen-Hayes, S. F., Ockerman, M. S., & Mason, E. C. M. (2014). 101 solutions for school counselors and leaders in challenging times. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.
  • Dotson-Blake, K. P. (2010). "Learning from each other: A portrait of family-school-community partnerships in the United States and Mexico". Professional School Counseling. 14: 101–114. doi:10.5330/prsc.14.1.e1v4q1r65t585048 (inactive 2024-02-07). S2CID 154790839.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Epstein, J. L.; Van Voorhis, F. L. (2010). "School counselors' roles in developing partnerships with families and communities for student success". Professional School Counseling. 14: 1–14. doi:10.5330/prsc.14.1.m6070358408g9227 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Griffen, D., & Farris, A. (2010). School counselors and school-family-community collaboration: Finding resources through community asset mapping, 13 248–256.
  • Griffen, D.; Galassi, J. P. (2010). "Parent perceptions of barriers to academic success in a rural middle school". Professional School Counseling. 14: 87–100. doi:10.5330/prsc.14.1.9301852175552845 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Griffen, D.; Steen, S. (2010). "School-family-community partnerships: Applying Epstein's theory of the six types of involvement to school counselor practice". Professional School Counseling. 14 (4): 218–226. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-13.218 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Holcomb-McCoy, C (2010). "Involving low-income parents and parents of color in college readiness activities: An exploratory study". Professional School Counseling. 14: 115–124. doi:10.5330/prsc.14.1.e3044v7567570t04 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Luke, M (2008). "School-family-community partnerships: Implications for school counselors to bridge the gap in urban schools". New York State School Counseling Journal. 5 (2): 13–22.
  • Moore-Thomas, C.; Day-Vines, N. L. (2010). "Culturally competent collaboration: School counselor collaboration with African American families and communities". Professional School Counseling. 14: 53–63. doi:10.5330/prsc.14.1.0876387q7466x634 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Sheely-Moore, A. I.; Bratton, S. C. (2010). "A strengths-based parenting intervention with low-income African American families". Professional School Counseling. 13 (3): 175–183. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-13.175 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Steen, S.; Noguera, P. A. (2010). "A broader and bolder approach to school reform: Expanded partnership roles for school counselors". Professional School Counseling. 14: 42–52. doi:10.5330/prsc.14.1.puq62087h7q70801 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Suarez-Orozco, C., Onaga, M., & de Lardemelle, C. (2010). Promoting academic engagement among immigrant adolescents through school-family-community collaboration. Professional School Counseling, 14 15–26.
  • Walker, J. M. T.; Shenker, S.; Hoover-Dempsey, K. V. (2010). "Why do parents become involved in their children's education? Implications for school counselors". Professional School Counseling. 14: 27–41. doi:10.5330/prsc.14.1.768th8v77571hm7r (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)

Supervision, site supervisors, and school counselor education[edit]

  • Brott, P. E. (2006). "Counselor education accountability: Training the effective professional school counselor". Professional School Counseling. 10 (2): 179–187. doi:10.5330/prsc.10.2.d61g0v3738863652 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Chen-Hayes, S. F., Ockerman, M. S., & Mason, E. C. M. (2014). 101 solutions for school counselors and leaders in challenging times. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.
  • Curry, J. R.; Bickmore, D. (2012). "School counselor induction and the importance of mattering". Professional School Counseling. 15 (3): 110–122. doi:10.1177/2156759X1201500301. S2CID 220183306.
  • DeKruyf, L.; Pehrsson, D. E. (2011). "School counseling site supervisor training: An exploratory study". Counselor Education and Supervision. 50 (5): 314–327. doi:10.1002/j.1556-6978.2011.tb01918.x.
  • Dixon, A. L.; Tucker, C.; Clark, M. A. (2010). "Integrating social justice advocacy with national standards of practice: Implications for school counselor education". Counselor Education and Supervision. 50 (2): 103–115. doi:10.1002/j.1556-6978.2010.tb00112.x.
  • Gibbons, M. M.; Studer, J. R. (2008). "Suicide awareness training for faculty and staff: A training model for school counselors". Professional School Counseling. 11 (4): 272–276. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-11.272 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Glosoff, H. L.; Durham, J. C. (2010). "Using supervision to prepare social justice counseling advocates". Counselor Education and Supervision. 50 (2): 116–129. doi:10.1002/j.1556-6978.2010.tb00113.x.
  • Hayes, R.; Paisley, P. (2002). "Transforming school counselor preparation programs". Theory into Practice. 41 (3): 170–176. doi:10.1207/s15430421tip4103_5. S2CID 143853117.
  • Herlihy, B.; Gray, N.; McCollum, V. (2002). "Ethical and legal issues in school counselor supervision". Professional School Counseling. 6: 55–60.
  • House, R. M.; Sears, S. J. (2002). "Preparing school counselors to be leaders and advocates: A critical need in the new millennium". Theory into Practice. 41 (3): 154–162. doi:10.1207/s15430421tip4103_3. S2CID 144317788.
  • Luke, M.; Bernard, J. M. (2006). "The school counseling supervision model: An extension of the discrimination model". Counselor Education and Supervision. 45 (4): 282–295. doi:10.1002/j.1556-6978.2006.tb00004.x.
  • Luke, M.; Ellis, M. V.; Bernard, J. M. (2011). "School counselor supervisors' perceptions of the discrimination model of supervision". Counselor Education and Supervision. 50 (5): 328–343. doi:10.1002/j.1556-6978.2011.tb01919.x.
  • Luke, M.; Gordon, C. (2011). "A discourse analysis of school counseling supervisory email". Counselor Education and Supervision. 50 (4): 274–291. doi:10.1002/j.1556-6978.2011.tb00124.x.
  • Magnuson, S.; Black, L. L.; Norem, K. (2004). "Supervising school counselors and interns: Resources for site supervisors". Journal of Professional Counseling, Practice, Theory, & Research. 32 (2): 4–15. doi:10.1080/15566382.2004.12033803. S2CID 58819916.
  • McDonald, K. E. (2011). "Teaching the 6th edition of APA style of writing in Counselor Education". Journal of Counselor Preparation and Supervision. 3: 123–141.
  • Miller, G. M.; Dollarhide, C. T. (2006). "Supervision in schools: Building pathways to excellence". Counselor Education and Supervision. 45 (4): 296–303. doi:10.1002/j.1556-6978.2006.tb00005.x.
  • Mullen, J A.; Luke, M.; Drewes, A. (2007). "Supervision can be playful too: Play therapy techniques that enhance supervision". International Journal of Play Therapy. 16: 69–85. doi:10.1037/1555-6824.16.1.69.
  • Murphy, S.; Kaffenberger, C. (2007). "ASCA National Model: The foundation for supervision of practicum and internship students". Professional School Counseling. 10 (3): 289–296. doi:10.5330/prsc.10.3.d4t0g103013n88t6 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Ockerman, M. S., Mason, E. C. M., & Chen-Hayes, S. F. (2013). School counseling supervision in challenging times: The CAFE supervisor model. Journal of Counselor Preparation and Supervision, 5(2), Article 4. DOI:10.7729/51.0024 http://repository.wcsu.edu/jcps/vol5/iss2/4/
  • Paisley, P.; Hayes, R. (2003). "School counseling in the academic domain: Transformation in preparation and practice". Professional School Counseling. 6: 198–204.
  • Perusse, R.; Goodnough, G. E.; Noel, C. J. (2001). "Counselor preparation: A national survey of school counselor programs: Screening methods, faculty experiences, curricular content, and fieldwork experiences". Counselor Education & Supervision. 40: 252–262. doi:10.1002/j.1556-6978.2001.tb01258.x.
  • Roberts, W. B.; Morotti, A. A.; Hendrick, C.; Tilbury, A. (2001). "Site supervisors of professional school counseling interns: Suggested guidelines". Professional School Counseling. 4: 208–215.
  • Savickas, M. L. (2011). "The centennial of Counselor Education: Origin and early development of a discipline". Journal of Counseling & Development. 89 (4): 500–503. doi:10.1002/j.1556-6676.2011.tb02848.x.
  • Schellenberg, R. (2012). The school counselor's guide to credentialing exams. New York: Routledge.
  • Stoltenberg, C. D., & McNeil, B. W. (2009). IDM supervision: An integrated developmental model for supervising counselors and therapists (3rd ed.). New York: Routledge.
  • Studer, J. R. (2006). Supervising the school counselor trainee: Guidelines for practice. Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association.
  • Studer, J. R. (2005). "Supervising counselors-in-training: A guide for field supervisors". Professional School Counseling. 8: 353–359.
  • Studer, J. R., & Diambra, J. F. (2010). A guide to practicum and internship for school counselor trainees. New York: Routledge.
  • Studer, J. R.; Oberman, A. (2006). "The use of the ASCA National Model in supervision". Professional School Counseling. 10: 82–87. doi:10.5330/prsc.10.1.f82t14475451422m (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Swank, J. M.; Tyson, L. (2012). "School counseling site supervisor training: A web-based approach". Professional School Counseling. 16: 40–48. doi:10.1177/2156759X1201600105. S2CID 72421214.
  • Wood, C.; Rayle, A. D. (2006). "A model of school counseling supervision: The goals, functions, roles, and systems model". Counselor Education and Supervision. 45 (4): 253–266. doi:10.1002/j.1556-6978.2006.tb00002.x.

Technology and school counseling[edit]

  • Chen-Hayes, S. F., Ockerman, M. S., & Mason, E. C. M. (2014). 101 solutions for school counselors and leaders in challenging times. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.
  • Milsom, A.; Bryant, J. (2006). "School counseling departmental web sites: What message do we send?". Professional School Counseling. 10 (2): 210–216. doi:10.5330/prsc.10.2.f36q578074204172 (inactive 2024-02-07).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2024 (link)
  • Sabella, R. (2008). GuardingKids.com: A practical guide to keeping kids out of high-tech trouble. Minneapolis, MN: Educational Media.
  • Sabella, R. (2004). Counseling in the 21st Century: Using technology to improve practice. Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association.
  • Sabella, R. (2003). SchoolCounselor.com: A friendly and practical guide to the World Wide Web (2nd ed.). Minneapolis, MN: Educational Media.
  • Schellenberg, R. C. (2008). The new school counselor: Strategies for universal academic achievement. Rowman Littlefield Education.

Transforming school counseling roles and professional identity[edit]

  • Bodenhorn, N.; Skaggs, G. (2005). "Development of the School Counselor Self-Efficacy Scale". Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development. 38: 14–28. doi:10.1080/07481756.2005.11909766. S2CID 141399766.
  • Burnham, J. J.; Jackson, M. (2000). "School counselor roles: Discrepancies between actual practice and existing models". Professional School Counseling. 4: 41–49.
  • Chen-Hayes, S. F., Ockerman, M. S., & Mason, E. C. M. (2014). 101 solutions for school counselors and leaders in challenging times. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.
  • Clark, M. A.; Amatea, E. (2004). "Teacher perceptions and expectations of school counselor contributions: Implications for program planning and training". Professional School Counseling. 8: 132–140.
  • DeKruyf, L.; Auger, R.; Trice-Black, S. (2013). "The role of school counselors in meeting students' mental health needs: Examining issues of professional identity". Professional School Counseling. 16 (5): 271–282. doi:10.1177/2156759X0001600502. S2CID 220196963.
  • Gordon, C.; Luke, M. (2011). "Discursive negotiation of face via email: Professional identity development in school counseling supervision". Linguistics & Education. 23: 112–122. doi:10.1016/j.linged.2011.05.002.
  • Hart, P. J., & Jacobi, M. (1992). From gatekeeper to advocate: Transforming the role of the school counselor. New York: College Entrance Examination Board.
  • Hatch, T (2008). "Professional challenges in school counseling: Organizational, institutional and political". Journal of School Counseling. 6 (22).
  • Holcomb-McCoy, C.; Bryan, J.; Rahill, S. (2002). "Importance of the school counseling CACREP standards: School counselors' perceptions". Professional School Counseling. 6: 112–119.
  • House, R. M.; Hayes, R. L. (2002). "School counselors: Becoming key players in school reform". Professional School Counseling. 5: 249–256.
  • House, R. M.; Martin, P. J. (1998). "Advocating for better futures for all students: A new vision for school counselors". Education. 119: 284–291.
  • Jackson, C. M.; Snow, B. M.; Boes, S. R.; Phillips, P. L.; Powell-Standard, R.; Painter, L. C. (2002). "Inducting the transformed school counselor into the profession". Theory into Practice. 41 (3): 177–185. doi:10.1207/s15430421tip4103_6. S2CID 144185321.
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