Elizabeth Fry Page

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Elizabeth Fry Page
Elizabeth Fry Page.png
BornElizabeth Fry
1865 (1865)
Hillsville, Virginia, U.S.
DiedSeptember 3, 1943 (aged 77–78)
Nashville, Tennessee, U.S.
Resting placeForest Hill Cemetery, Chattanooga, Tennessee, U.S.
Occupationauthor, magazine editor, poet, journalist
Genreessays, short stories, poetry
Spouse
David Samuel Page
(m. 1898)

Elizabeth Fry Page (née, Fry; 1865 – September 3, 1943) was an American author and editor associated with the South. A co-founder of the Tennessee Woman's Press and Authors' Club, she served as the Poet Laureate of the Tennessee division of the Daughters of the American Revolution (D.A.R.) and that of the Tennessee Division, United Daughters of the Confederacy (UDC). She lectured on literary, musical and philosophical subjects.[1] Coming from a long line of literary ancestors, Page's journalistic life began early, and she worked in many branches of her profession, as a journalist, magazine editor, essayist, short story writer and a producer of verse.[1] Page was a veteran club woman.[2]

Early life and education[edit]

Elizabeth Fry was born in Hillsville, Virginia, 1865.[3] She was a daughter of Col. George Thompson Fry (1843-1897), civil war veteran, and Mary A. A. (Cooley) Fry.[4][5] She was of revolutionary ancestry.[6] Her siblings included, brothers George and Henry,[7] and a sister, Mary.[8]

Page was educated at Girls' High School, Atlanta, Georgia, and by private tutors in English, music and philosophy.[5] Page began her writing career by providing feature articles for newspapers in Atlanta.[7]

Career[edit]

Her first attempts at writing were girlish epistles written for the Sunny South's letter box.[9]

She was a special writer for the Chattanooga Times, 1891-44. Next, she edited the Southern Florist and Gardener, 1894–97, resigning on account of ill-health. It was while editing the Southern Florist and Gardener that a pink chrysanthemum was named after her -the Elizabeth Fry- which attracted considerable attention, and proved a prize winner on several occasions.[9] She was an associate editor at American Homes, 1895-96.[6][5]

In Chattanooga, Tennessee, on January 12, 1898, she married David Samuel Page,[5] a pharmacist. They resided for a bit in Louisville, Kentucky.[7]

Ernestine Noa, Louise Munford Peeples, Elizabeth Fry Page (l-r) , co-founders, Tennessee Woman's Press and Authors' Club, 1899

In 1899, with Ernestine Noa and Louise Munford Peeples, she co-founded the Tennessee Woman's Press and Authors' Club.[5] Page held several office within the organization, including president.[10]

1911

Page was the author of, Vagabond Victor (juvenile), 1908, and Edward MacDowell—His Work and Ideals (Dodge and Co., N. Y.,). She wrote many stories, essays and poems in magazines.[5] Many of her lyrics were set to music. She was the recipient of several prizes after participating in essay and poetry contests.[1] She as associate editor of Taylor-Trotwood Magazine, Nashville, April–September, 1910.[6][5] Page served as Poet Laureate of the Tennessee D.A.R., 1912–13, and of the Tennessee Division, UDC, 1913.[6] She was a lecturer on literature and philosophical subjects.[6][5]

Page was very involved in religious work of the Episcopal church. For seventeen years, in Nashville, she taught the adult Women's Bible class in Christ Church. She also taught a religious class for women in the Tennessee state prison.[11] From 1925 to 1927, Page resided in Tampa, Florida.[12] During part of that time, she served as religious educational secretary to Rev. Willis G. Clark, St. Andrew's Episcopal Church.[13] From 1929 to 1935, she resided in Canyon, Texas, serving as Episcopal student counselor at the West Texas State Teachers College (now West Texas A&M University) and resident hostess at the Episcopal Diocese of Texas' "Little House of Fellowship".[14][15][16] In 1931, along with 6,000 others, she attended the General Convention of the Episcopal Church at Denver, Colorado, as a representative of four organizations: the Daughters of the King (District of North Texas), the West Texas State Teachers College, the United Thank Offering, and the Woman's Auxilliary.[17]

Page was a member of the D.A.R., U.D.C., Nashville Centennial Club,[6] Nashville Story Tellers' League and the Southern Writers' League, as well as a sustaining member of the Nashville YWCA. She was the organizer and served as president of the Nashville Metaphysical Club.[18] Page favored woman suffrage, and was a charter member of the Nashville Equal Suffrage League.[5]

Personal life[edit]

In December 1935, Page returned to Nashville,[15][7][5] After an illness lasting two years, she died in Nashville, September 3, 1943.[19] Burial was at Forest Hill Cemetery, Chattanooga.[7]

Selected works[edit]

  • Vagabond Victor: Or, The Downfall of a Dog; a True Story, 1908
  • Edward MacDowell, his work and ideals, by Elizabeth Fry Page, with poetical interpretations by the author., 1910
  • The romance of Southern journalism, 1910
  • A garden fantasy, 1923
  • Lookout Mountain

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Prince 1920, p. 6.
  2. ^ Taylor 1905, p. 27.
  3. ^ Page, Elizabeth Fry (16 October 2004). "Edward MacDowell, His Work and Ideals". Retrieved 20 November 2021.
  4. ^ Porter 1899, p. 482.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Leonard 1914, p. 618.
  6. ^ a b c d e f Leonard & Marquis 1914, p. 1782.
  7. ^ a b c d e "Rites for Mrs. Page Will Be Held Today. Writer, Poet Dies After Two Years' Illness". The Tennessean. 4 September 1943. p. 9. Retrieved 20 February 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ "Looking Backward". Chattanooga Daily Times. 15 March 1949. p. 12. Retrieved 21 February 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  9. ^ a b "A Clever Young Journalist". Virginian-Pilot. 17 December 1899. p. 11. Retrieved 21 February 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  10. ^ O'Brien, Claire (2 August 1924). "State Press Club Was Founded Here". The Chattanooga News. p. 7. Retrieved 21 February 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  11. ^ "Tampa Is Appraised as City Of Real Religious Idealism. Educational Leader is Engaged By St. Andrews". The Tampa Times. 22 April 1926. p. 15. Retrieved 21 February 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  12. ^ "The Personal Side". The Tennessean. 1 June 1927. p. 3. Retrieved 21 February 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  13. ^ "Mrs. Elizabeth Fry Page to Arrive Wednesday". The Tampa Times. 4 October 1926. p. 4. Retrieved 21 February 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  14. ^ "Mrs. Elizabeth Fry Page Is Resigning Canyon Position". Lubbock Morning Avalanche. 24 October 1935. p. 11. Retrieved 21 February 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  15. ^ a b "'Friendship House' Hostess Resigns". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. 22 December 1935. p. 35. Retrieved 21 February 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  16. ^ "Luncheon Compliments Mrs. Elizabeth F. Page". Nashville Banner. 30 December 1932. p. 5. Retrieved 21 February 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  17. ^ Brewer, Emil (24 September 1931). "Society in Canyon. Mrs. Elizabeth Fry Page Is Honored At Episcopal Convention In Denver". The Canyon News. p. 4. Retrieved 21 February 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  18. ^ "Nashville Metaphysical Club". Nashville Banner. 8 March 1913. p. 5. Retrieved 21 February 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  19. ^ "Services For Mrs. Page". Nashville Banner. 4 September 1943. p. 10. Retrieved 21 February 2021 – via Newspapers.com.

Attribution[edit]

  • Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain: Leonard, John William; Marquis, Albert Nelson (1914). Who's who in America. Vol. 8 (Public domain ed.). A.N. Marquis.
  • Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain: Leonard, John W. (1914). Woman's Who's who of America. Vol. 1 (Public domain ed.). American Commonwealth Company.
  • Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain: Porter, James Davis (1899). Tennessee (Public domain ed.). Confederate Publishing Company.
  • Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain: Prince, Clara Catharine, ed. (1920). American Poetry Magazine. Vol. 3–4 (Public domain ed.). American Literary Association.
  • Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain: Taylor, Governor Bob (1905). The Taylor-Trotwood Magazine. Vol. 1–2 (Public domain ed.). Taylor Publishing Company.

External links[edit]