African Americans in New York (state)

African Americans in New York
Total population
3.002 million[1] (2020)
Regions with significant populations
In major New York cities such as New York City, Buffalo, Syracuse, Albany, and Rochester and also smaller cities and towns in or near the Hudson Valley between New York City and Albany such as Poughkeepsie, Newburgh and Monticello[2]
Religion
Christianity[3]

African-American New Yorkers are residents of the U.S. state of New York who are of African American ancestry. As of the 2020 U.S. Census, African-Americans were 17.6% of the state's population.[4] New York has the third largest African American population of any state in the United States, after Texas and Georgia.[5] Black people were brought to the state during the slave trade when New York was a Dutch colony.[6][7][8][9] New York abolished slavery in 1827.[10] Many black Southerners from Southern states such as Georgia, Virginia and the Carolinas moved to the state during the Great Migration. A second Black migration wave from Caribbean countries such as Jamaica began around the same time.[11]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "New York - Place Explorer - Data Commons". datacommons.org. Retrieved 9 December 2023.
  2. ^ "New York State - BlackDemographics.com". Retrieved 9 December 2023.
  3. ^ "Religious Landscape Study". Retrieved 9 December 2023.
  4. ^ Quickfacts census.gov
  5. ^ Tamir, Christine (25 March 2021). "The Growing Diversity of Black America". Retrieved 9 December 2023.
  6. ^ "Was There Slavery In New York City & New York State? | MNYS". www.mnys.org. Retrieved 9 December 2023.
  7. ^ MCDONNELL, MICHAEL A. (2001). "Slavery and Community in the New York Region". Australasian Journal of American Studies. 20 (2): 110–112. JSTOR 41053874. Retrieved 9 December 2023 – via JSTOR.
  8. ^ "Life in New Amsterdam Educator Resource Guide" (PDF). Retrieved 9 December 2023.
  9. ^ Wagman, Morton (9 January 1980). "Corporate Slavery in New Netherland". The Journal of Negro History. 65 (1): 34–42. doi:10.2307/3031546. JSTOR 3031546. S2CID 150062964. Retrieved 9 December 2023 – via CrossRef.
  10. ^ Eisenstadt, Peter (19 May 2005). The Encyclopedia of New York State. Syracuse University Press. ISBN 978-0-8156-0808-0. Retrieved 9 December 2023 – via Google Books.
  11. ^ "New York Migration History 1850-2018 - America's Great Migrations". depts.washington.edu. Retrieved 4 January 2024.

External links[edit]