YUSCII

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YUSCII encoding family
MIME / IANALatin: JUS_I.B1.002
Serbian Cyrillic: JUS_I.B1.003-serb
Macedonian: JUS_I.B1.003-mac[1]
Alias(es)Latin: ISO 646-YU, CROSCII, SLOSCII
Serbian: SRPSCII
Macedonian: MAKSCII
Language(s)Serbian, Croatian, Bosnian, Slovenian, Macedonian
StandardLatin: JUS I.B1.002
Serbian Cyrillic: JUS I.B1.003
Macedonian: JUS I.B1.004
Classification7-bit encoding
Latin: ISO 646
Succeeded byLatin: ISO 8859-2, Windows-1250
Cyrillic: ISO 8859-5, Windows-1251
Other related encoding(s)KOI-7

YUSCII is an informal name for several JUS standards for 7-bit character encoding. These include:

The encodings are based on ISO 646, 7-bit Latinic character encoding standard, and were used in Yugoslavia before widespread use of later ISO-8859-2/8859-5, Windows-1250/1251 and Unicode standards. It was named after ASCII, having the first word "American" replaced with "Yugoslav": "Yugoslav Standard Code for Information Interchange". Specific standards are also sometimes called by a local name: SLOSCII, CROSCII or SRPSCII for JUS I.B1.002, SRPSCII for JUS I.B1.003, MAKSCII for JUS I.B1.004.

JUS I.B1.002 is a national ISO 646 variant, i.e. equal to basic ASCII with less frequently used symbols replaced with specific letters of Gaj's alphabet. Cyrillic standards further replace Latin alphabet letters with corresponding Cyrillic letters. Љ (lj), Њ (nj), Џ (dž) and ѕ (dz) correspond to Latin digraphs, and are mapped over Latin letters which are not used in Serbian or Macedonian (q, w, x, y).

YUSCII was originally developed for teleprinters but it also spread for computer use. This was widely considered a bad idea among software developers who needed the original ASCII such as {, [, }, ], ^, ~, |, \ in their source code (an issue partly addressed by trigraphs in C). On the other hand, an advantage of YUSCII is that it remains comparatively readable even when support for it is not available, similarly to the Russian KOI-7. Numerous attempts to replace it with something better kept failing due to limited support. Eventually, Microsoft's introduction of code pages, appearance of Unicode and availability of fonts finally spelled sure (but nevertheless still slow) end of YUSCII.[citation needed]

Codepage layout[edit]

Code points remained largely the same as in ASCII to maintain maximum compatibility. Following table shows allocation of character codes in YUSCII. Heavy-bordered entries highlight differences from ASCII when interpreted as Latin based characters. Both Latin and Cyrillic glyphs are shown:

YUSCII[2][3][4]
_0 _1 _2 _3 _4 _5 _6 _7 _8 _9 _A _B _C _D _E _F
0_
0
NUL
0000
SOH
0001
STX
0002
ETX
0003
EOT
0004
ENQ
0005
ACK
0006
BEL
0007
BS
0008
HT
0009
LF
000A
VT
000B
FF
000C
CR
000D
SO
000E
SI
000F
1_
16
DLE
0010
DC1
0011
DC2
0012
DC3
0013
DC4
0014
NAK
0015
SYN
0016
ETB
0017
CAN
0018
EM
0019
SUB
001A
ESC
001B
FS
001C
GS
001D
RS
001E
US
001F
2_
32
SP
0020
!
0021
"
0022
#
0023
$
0024
%
0025
&
0026
'
0027
(
0028
)
0029
*
002A
+
002B
,
002C
-
002D
.
002E
/
002F
3_
48
0
0030
1
0031
2
0032
3
0033
4
0034
5
0035
6
0036
7
0037
8
0038
9
0039
:
003A
;
003B
<
003C
=
003D
>
003E
?
003F
4_
64
Ž/Ж
017D/0416
A/А
0041/0410
B/Б
0042/0411
C/Ц
0043/0426
D/Д
0044/0414
E/Е
0045/0415
F/Ф
0046/0424
G/Г
0047/0413
H/Х
0048/0425
I/И
0049/0418
J/Ј
004A/0408
K/К
004B/041A
L/Л
004C/041B
M/М
004D/041C
N/Н
004E/041D
O/О
004F/041E
5_
80
P/П
0050/041F
Q/Љ
0051/0409
R/Р
0052/0420
S/С
0053/0421
T/Т
0054/0422
U/У
0055/0423
V/В
0056/0412
W/Њ
0057/040A
X/Џ
0058/040F
Y/Ѕ
0059/0405
Z/З
005A/0417
Š/Ш
0160/0428
Đ/Ђ/Ѓ
0110/0402
Ć/Ћ/Ќ
0106/040B
Č/Ч
010C/0427
_
005F
6_
96
ž/ж
017E/0436
a/а
0061/0430
b/б
0062/0431
c/ц
0063/0446
d/д
0064/0434
e/е
0065/0435
f/ф
0066/0444
g/г
0067/0433
h/х
0068/0445
i/и
0069/0438
j/ј
006A/0458
k/к
006B/043A
l/л
006C/043B
m/м
006D/043C
n/н
006E/043D
o/о
006F/043E
7_
112
p/п
0070/043F
q/љ
0071/0459
r/р
0072/0440
s/с
0073/0441
t/т
0074/0442
u/у
0075/0443
v/в
0076/0432
w/њ
0077/045A
x/џ
0078/045F
y/ѕ
0079/0455
z/з
007A/0437
š/ш
0161/0448
đ/ђ/ѓ
0111/0452
ć/ћ/ќ
0107/045B
č/ч
010D/0447
DEL
007F

  Letter   Number   Punctuation   Symbol   Other  Undefined   Latin different from ASCII

World System Teletext[edit]

YUSCII should not be confused with the G0 Latin set for Serbian, Croatian and Slovene,[5] or the G0 Cyrillic set for Serbian,[6] defined by World System Teletext. Like YUSCII, these are based on ASCII and are where possible homologous with each other for Serbian letters. However, they make different decisions and consequently are not compatible with YUSCII. Macedonian letters Ќ and Ѓ are also assigned unique positions rather than the same as their Serbian equivalents, whereas the lowercase form of Џ and the Macedonian letter Ѕ are not supported.[a] The WST G0 sets are detailed below for reference. Differences from YUSCII are shown with a heavy green border.

World System Teletext G0 sets for Latin[5] and Cyrillic[6] script Serbian, Croatian and Slovene
_0 _1 _2 _3 _4 _5 _6 _7 _8 _9 _A _B _C _D _E _F
0_
0
NUL
0000
SOH
0001
STX
0002
ETX
0003
EOT
0004
ENQ
0005
ACK
0006
BEL
0007
BS
0008
HT
0009
LF
000A
VT
000B
FF
000C
CR
000D
SO
000E
SI
000F
1_
16
DLE
0010
DC1
0011
DC2
0012
DC3
0013
DC4
0014
NAK
0015
SYN
0016
ETB
0017
CAN
0018
EM
0019
SUB
001A
ESC
001B
FS
001C
GS
001D
RS
001E
US
001F
2_
32
SP
0020
!
0021
"
0022
#
0023
Ë/$
00CB/0024
%
0025
&
0026
'
0027
(
0028
)
0029
*
002A
+
002B
,
002C
-
002D
.
002E
/
002F
3_
48
0
0030
1
0031
2
0032
3
0033
4
0034
5
0035
6
0036
7
0037
8
0038
9
0039
:
003A
;
003B
<
003C
=
003D
>
003E
?
003F
4_
64
Č/Ч
010C/0427
A/А
0041/0410
B/Б
0042/0411
C/Ц
0043/0426
D/Д
0044/0414
E/Е
0045/0415
F/Ф
0046/0424
G/Г
0047/0413
H/Х
0048/0425
I/И
0049/0418
J/Ј
004A/0408
K/К
004B/041A
L/Л
004C/041B
M/М
004D/041C
N/Н
004E/041D
O/О
004F/041E
5_
80
P/П
0050/041F
Q/Ќ
0051/040C
R/Р
0052/0420
S/С
0053/0421
T/Т
0054/0422
U/У
0055/0423
V/В
0056/0412
W/Ѓ
0057/0403
X/Љ
0058/0409
Y/Њ
0059/040A
Z/З
005A/0417
Ć/Ћ
0106/040B
Ž/Ж
017D/0416
Đ/Ђ
0110/0402
Š/Ш
0160/0428
ë/Џ
00EB/040F
6_
96
č/ч
010D/0447
a/а
0061/0430
b/б
0062/0431
c/ц
0063/0446
d/д
0064/0434
e/е
0065/0435
f/ф
0066/0444
g/г
0067/0433
h/х
0068/0445
i/и
0069/0438
j/ј
006A/0458
k/к
006B/043A
l/л
006C/043B
m/м
006D/043C
n/н
006E/043D
o/о
006F/043E
7_
112
p/п
0070/043F
q/ќ
0071/045C
r/р
0072/0440
s/с
0073/0441
t/т
0074/0442
u/у
0075/0443
v/в
0076/0432
w/ѓ
0077/0453
x/љ
0078/0459
y/њ
0079/045A
z/з
007A/0437
ć/ћ
0107/045B
ž/ж
017E/0436
đ/ђ
0111/0452
š/ш
0161/0448

25A0

  Letter   Number   Punctuation   Symbol   Other  Undefined   Different from YUSCII

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ The Teletext G1 set for use with Cyrillic, listed in section 15.6.7 table 41 of the standard, contains a subset of Roman letters, mostly those without Cyrillic homoglyphs in the G0 sets. These include S.
  1. ^ "Character Sets". IANA. 2018-12-12.
  2. ^ a b Federal Institution for Standardization (1987-11-01). ISO-IR-141: Serbocroatian and Slovenian Latin Alphabet (PDF). Information Technology Standards Commission of Japan (IPSJ/ITSCJ).
  3. ^ a b Federal Institution for Standardization (1988-10-01). ISO-IR-146: Serbocroatian Cyrillic Alphabet (PDF). Information Technology Standards Commission of Japan (IPSJ/ITSCJ).
  4. ^ a b Federal Institution for Standardization (1988-10-01). ISO-IR-147: Macedonian Cyrillic Alphabet (PDF). Information Technology Standards Commission of Japan (IPSJ/ITSCJ).
  5. ^ a b "15.6.2 Latin National Option Sub-Sets, Table 36". ETS 300 706: Enhanced Teletext specification (PDF). European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI). p. 115.
  6. ^ a b "15.6.4 Cyrillic G0 Set - Option 1 - Serbian/Croatian, Table 38". ETS 300 706: Enhanced Teletext specification (PDF). European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI). p. 117.