Tututni language

Jump to navigation Jump to search
Tututni
Tutudin, Coquille, Lower Rogue River
Rogue River
Native toOregon
EthnicityCoquille tribe, Tututni tribe (including Euchre Creek band), Chasta Costa tribe
Extinct1983[1]
Language codes
ISO 639-3Either:
tuu – Tututni
coq – Coquille
Glottologtutu1242  Tututni[2]
coqu1236  Coquille[3]

Tututni (Dotodəni, alternatively "Tutudin"), also known as Coquille and (Lower) Rogue River, is an extinct Athabaskan language once spoken by three Tututni (Lower Rogue River Athabaskan) tribes: Tututni tribe (including Euchre Creek band), Coquille tribe, and Chasta Costa tribe who are part of the Rogue River Indian peoples of southwestern Oregon. Ten speakers remained in 1961; the last fluent speaker died in 1983.[1] In 2006 students at Linfield College participated in a project to "revitalize the language." [4] It is one of the four languages belonging to the Oregon Athabaskan cluster of the Pacific Coast Athabaskan languages.

Dialects were Coquille (Upper Coquille, Mishikhwutmetunee), spoken along the upper Coquille River;[1] Tututni (Tututunne, Naltunnetunne, Mikonotunne, Kwatami, Chemetunne, Chetleshin, Khwaishtunnetunnne); Euchre Creek, and Chasta Costa (Illinois River, Šista Qʼʷə́sta).

Phonology[edit]

The following lists the consonant and vowel sounds in the Tututni language[5]:

Consonants
Bilabial Alveolar Retroflex Lateral Palatal Velar Glottal
plain lab.
Plosive plain p t k ʔ
aspirated
ejective kʼʷ
Affricate plain
aspirated tʃʰ
ejective tsʼ tʂʼ tɬʼ tʃʼ
Fricative plain s ʂ ɬ ʃ x h
voiced ɣ ɣʷ
Sonorant m n l j

Vowels in Tututni are /i e a o ə/.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Tututni at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
    Coquille at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
  2. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Tututni". Glottolog 3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.
  3. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Coquille". Glottolog 3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.
  4. ^ [1]
  5. ^ Golla, Victor (1976). Tututni (Oregon Athapaskan). pp. 217–227.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]