Transitional housing

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Transitional housing provides temporary housing for the certain segments of the homeless population, including working homeless making insufficient wages who have trouble affording long-term housing, and is set up to transition their residents into permanent, affordable housing. It is not in an emergency homeless shelter but usually a room or apartment in a residence with support services.

Description[edit]

The transitional time can be short, for example one or two years, and in that time the person must file for and get permanent housing and usually some gainful employment or income, even if Social Security or assistance. Sometimes, the transitional housing residence program charges a room and board fee, maybe 30% of an individual's income, which is sometimes partially or fully refunded after the person procures a permanent place to live in. In the USA, federal funding for transitional housing programs was originally allocated in the McKinney–Vento Homeless Assistance Act of 1986.[1][2][3]

An example of Transitional Housing designed specifically for youth is the Foyer model. Providers generally provide a combination of affordable accommodation with vocational, work, and counseling opportunities.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Burt, Martha R., "Characteristics of Transitional Housing for Homeless Families Final Report", Urban Institute, Washington, DC, September 7, 2006,
  2. ^ Dordick, Gwendolyn A., "Recovering from Homelessness: Determining the 'Quality of Sobriety' in a Transitional Housing Program", Journal Qualitative Sociology, Volume 25, Number 1 / March, 2002, Springer Netherlands.
  3. ^ Karash, Robert L., "The Graduate", Spare Change News, Boston, March 11, 2010