One Central Park

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One Central Park
(1)Central building Broadway Sydney-1.jpg
Address28 Broadway, Chippendale, Sydney (Map)
Coordinates33°53′03″S 151°12′01″E / 33.8843°S 151.2003°E / -33.8843; 151.2003Coordinates: 33°53′03″S 151°12′01″E / 33.8843°S 151.2003°E / -33.8843; 151.2003
StatusComplete
Groundbreaking2012
Constructed2012-2013
OpeningDecember 2013
UseMixed
Websitewww.centralparksydney.com/live/one-central-park
Companies
ArchitectFoster and Partners, Ateliers Jean Nouvel and PTW Architects
OwnerFrasers Property Group
Technical details
Buildings2
Sizehectare

One Central Park is an award-winning mixed-use building located in Sydney, Australia in the suburb of Chippendale.[1] Developed as a joint venture between Frasers Property and Sekisui House, it was constructed as the first stage of the Central Park urban renewal project.[2]

The building itself comprises two residential apartment towers, an east and west tower, in addition to a six level retail shopping centre at the base of the towers.[3][4] In 2013, One Central Park was awarded a 5 star Green Star – ‘Multi-Unit Residential Design v1’ Certified Rating by the Green Building Council of Australia, making it the largest multi-residential building (by nett lettable area) in Australia to receive such a designation.[5][6]

History[edit]

Heliostat at One Central Park with UTS tower in background

Formerly occupied by Carlton & United Breweries, the site of Central Park was purchased by Singaporean Developer Fraser Property for $208 million in 2007.[7] When commenting on the acquisition at the time, Fraser Property chief executive Dr Stanley Quek stated, "What we want is to create a village that people can work and play in. It’s [a place] for people who want to live in Glebe but can’t afford Glebe prices".[8]

Changes in the New South Wales political climate meant the state government was granted approval authority over local councils for developments deemed "state significant projects".[8] Therefore, in 2009 it was the state government of New South Wales that provided approval of an enhanced master scheme of Central Park that was put forth by London based architectural firm Foster and Partners.[8] Foster and Partners along with Paris based firm Ateliers Jean Nouvel and Sydney based firm PTW Architects collaborated to form the Central Park project's architectural team.[9] The new master scheme included a larger floor area, additional open space, trigeneration as well as provisions to ensure the project's buildings could achieve a 5 star green star rating.[8]

In February 2010, construction of the Central Park project’s main park, roads and basements commenced.[2] With the One Central Park building operating as the first residential stage of the entire development, its apartments were the first to be released to the public; going on sale in August 2010.[10] One Central Park west tower saw its completion in May 2013 and thus welcomed the very first residents of Central Park.[2] The official opening of One Central Park occurred later that year, in December 2013.[11]

With the completion of One Central Park, the development of the Central Park precinct moved to the next phases of its $2 billion urban village plan.[10] This culminated in the construction of Park Lane in 2013/2014 and The Mark in 2014, the release of Sky at One Central Park (a collection of Penthouses and Sub Penthouses) as well as the provision of student accommodation facilities in 2015.[2][12][13][14] The next residential stage of the Central Park project is Connor.[15]

On 21 February 2014, Fraser Property in conjunction with Sekisui House issued a media release announcing that Central Park had sold apartments worth $1 billion.[16] It was stated that the first three residential stages of Central Park (One Central Park, Park Lane and The Mark) had exchanged contracts worth in excess of 1,300 apartments at an average price of AUD $770, 000 per apartment.[16]

Design[edit]

One Central Park as seen from Harris Street, Ultimo.

Built by Australian construction, civil and mining company Watpac, One Central Park is a two-tower complex that forms part of the larger Central Park precinct.[17] The Central Park precinct, which is located on just less than six hectares of land, was designed to allow for the development of approximately 235,000 square metres of residential, commercial and retail space. Initial project forecasts anticipated that around 2,200 residential apartments and 900 student dwellings would be constructed over 3–10 years.[2][18]

One Central Park is situated on the northeastern corner of the precinct, comprising a total site area of 6,060 square metres.[8] The building itself is made up of 4 below ground levels and 34 above ground floors, allowing for the configuration of 623 apartments in addition to 625 car parking spaces.[19] When measured from the base of the building to its highest point, One Central Park has a height of 117 metres.[19] The gross floor area of the total development is recorded at 255,500 m2.[19] At the foot of the towers is a naturally lit six level retail area, which incorporates a variety of fashion, technology, casual dining, restaurants and entertainment outlets.[4]

Whilst Foster and Partners, Ateliers Jean Nouvel and PTW Architects worked in collaboration to form the basis of the One Central Park architectural team, two interior architects were separately utilised for the east and west towers.[20] Koichi Takada was commissioned with designing the east tower of One Central Park.[20] He gave the apartments an organic feel that blended the outside foliage and gardens with the wooden interiors.[20] William Smart of Smart Design Studios was appointed to style the west tower.[20] Smart's designs, based on the idea of luxury that comes from high-end sports cars and motor yachts, used sophisticated curves and glossy finishes in the apartments in the west tower.[20]

Building features[edit]

A number of distinct features has allowed One Central Park to be recognised as a unique structure at an international level.[7] Key among them are its vertical hanging gardens, cantilevered heliostat, low carbon tri-generation power plant and internal water recycling plant.[7]

Vertical hanging gardens[edit]

Hanging gardens of One Central Park.

One Central Park’s vertical gardens were inspired by the collaboration of French botanist Patrick Blanc and architect’s Ateliers Jean Nouvel.[21] A living tapestry of plants, flowers and vines which stretch over 50 metres high, it has become the world’s tallest vertical garden.[21] During the construction phase of One Central Park, the concept of putting the vertical garden onto the building brought with it a variety of complexities and challenges.[17] As Watpac Construction NSW/ACT State Manager Ric Wang highlighted, "Patrick Blanc’s garden concept is a hydroponic system which in effect hangs off the building, so we had to revise the original façade design and methodology to make it possible".[17] The solution to the problem saw individually designed planter boxes installed which were supported by floor slabs to create the effect of the ‘living wall’ aspect of the façade design.[17] Each horizontal and vertical planter required its own irrigation system, which is centrally managed through a building management system that is able to monitor and account for environmental conditions.[17] Over 35,000 green wall plants were utilised within which 350 different species were selected for the green walls alone.[17] The building houses 23 green walls, equating to a total area of 1, 200m2.[17] In all, 85,000 facade plants make up the vertical gardens of One Central Park.[17] Both exotic and Australian native plants have been included to make up the "living wall", ranging from well known species to those that are deemed rare.[22] Critical to the success of the vertical gardens was Blanc’s insistence that the plants do not need soil to grow provided they have something to attach to.[23] Light, carbon dioxide water and nutrients are dispersed mechanically to the plants in order to stimulate their growth and survival.[23] By having the vertical garden hang off the wall without soil is it possible for the plants to grow without compromising the structural integrity of the building.[23]

Local Sydney Living Infrastructure specialist, Junglefy worked with French botanist Patrick Blanc and Watpac to deliver the world’s tallest vertical garden at 130m high (over 1120 square metres). Junglefy engineered the support brackets and aluminium frames and modularised the whole project. The installation methodology was the first of its kind anywhere in the world for this green facade system. Junglefy were also responsible for fabrication, assembly and installation of Blanc’s vertical garden, ensuring it met Australian building standards and was integrated into the 28-month building program, including the installation of the support brackets, frames, sheeting, irrigation, felt and plants. Junglefy continue to be responsible for the ongoing maintenance and plant health of the entire site, much of this work is completed via a swing stage regularly checking on structure, plant health, pests and diseases as well as pruning and removal of rubbish.[24]

Cantilevered heliostat[edit]

The cantilevered heliostat of One Central Park is attached to the eastern tower of the complex.

Central Park’s cantilevered heliostat figures as another defining feature of the building. Suspended from the 28th floor of One Central Park’s east tower, it serves not only as a predominant design element to the building but as a way of reflecting light to the gardens and atrium below.[25][26] It operates through a series of motorised mirrors that are positioned 100 metres below the cantilever on the rooftop of the west tower.[25] Daylight is automatically tracked from these mirrors and the light is reflected up to the cantilever.[25] 220 fixed reflecting panels are positioned across the underbelly of the cantilever and are able to then bounce light throughout the retail atrium, pedestrian corridor, pool terrace and communal areas.[25] On the upper side of the cantilever a sky garden has been erected.[25] At night the cantilever is transformed into an LED light display through the work of international lighting artist Yann Kersalé.[25][27]

Sustainable initiatives[edit]

At the core of Central Park is a commitment to sustainability and self-sufficiency, which is reflected in two measures incorporated in the precinct: a low carbon tri generation power plant and an internal water recycling plant.[28]

Central Park is projected to utilise its own low-carbon natural gas power plant, which shall allow for thermal energy to be produced for both residents and employees.[28] The first stage of this measure involves a two megawatt tri generation energy plant which, when completed in November 2015, will run on natural gas and have the capacity to produce carbon thermal energy, heating and cooling for 3000 residences and 65,000 square metres of retail and commercial space.[7][28] Tri generation is believed to be twice as efficient as coal fired power plants and it is forecasted that Central Parks’ trigeneration energy plant could reduce greenhouse gas emissions by as much as 190,000 tonnes over the 25-year design life of the plant.[28]

Central park’s recycled water network houses the world's biggest membrane bioreactor recycled water facility in the basement of the residential building.[28] It is designed to service approximately 4,000 residents and more than 15,000 visitors and workers daily.[28] The recycled water network has the capacity to harness multiple water sources with varying qualities and create a multitude of water supplies, which cover all the water requirements of the community.[28] Water sources include:[28]

  • Rainwater from roofs
  • Storm water from impermeable surfaces/planter box drainage
  • Groundwater from basement drainage systems
  • Sewage from an adjacent public sewer
  • Sewage from all buildings within the Central Park community
  • Irrigation water from all green walls
  • Drinking water from the public water main.

Amenities[edit]

Inside the One Central Park retail precinct.

The One Central Park building provides a number of amenities not only for its own residents but for those that occupy two of the other buildings in the Central Park precinct, Park Lane and The Mark.[29] The first of which is a private 280-square metre gymnasium located on level 4 of the retail mall.[29] It is for the exclusive use of Central Park residents and features a variety of commercial grade equipment.[29] Additionally, a pool terrace is also provided in the open-air podium between the East and West towers.[29] It features a 20-metre outdoor heated pool and spa, shaded seating and a soft lawn.[29] One Central Park also offers a lobby for both the East and West towers in addition to a 24/7 concierge service.[29]

Sky at One Central Park[edit]

Upon their completion in January 2014, One Central Park released an assortment of single level sub-penthouses and dual level penthouses apartments under the name "Sky at One Central Park".[16] Located on the top five levels of the east tower above the cantilever, Sky at One Central Park comprises 38 exclusive residences with panoramic views of the city skyline, the Blue Mountains, the eastern suburbs and Botany Bay.[11]

The collection of sub-penthouse apartments range in size from 127 to 161 square metres and upon market offering were priced between AUD $1.68 million to AUD $2.575 million.[11] Penthouse apartments range in size from 158 to 207 square metres and upon market offering were priced between AUD $2.65 million to AUD $3 million.[11]

Residents of Sky at One Central Park enjoy all the amenities that come with living at One Central Park- gymnasium, outdoor pool terrace- as well as some additional exclusivities. Sky residents enjoy a separate street entrance and address, private foyer and 24/7 Concierge, dedicated high-speed lifts, and exclusive access to the Sky Garden terrace.[11] The Sky Garden terrace is situated on top of the cantilever and provides an outdoor dining room, plunge pool, barbeque, kitchenette, sculptural timber seating as well as the plantation of advanced trees and lush landscaping.[11]

Awards[edit]

One Central Park at dusk

One Central Park has received numerous accolades and awards that have recognised both its structural ingenuity and sustainability measures.[1]

In 2014, the more noteworthy awards included:

  • Winner of the Sustainability Award from LEAF Awards 2014 (global)
  • Overall Winner of the LEAF Awards 2014 (global)
  • Winner of the Best Cogeneration or District Energy Project from the Energy Efficiency Council 2014 (national)
  • Winner of the International Green Infrastructure Award from World Green Infrastructure Congress 2014 (global)
  • Winner of the Best Tall Building Worldwide from the Council for Tall Building and Urban Habitat (global).[1]

In 2015, some of the more prominent awards it achieved included:

  • Winner of the Best Interior Fitout Award from ASOFIA 2014/15 Interior Fitout Awards (national)
  • Winner of the High Density Development by 2015 UDIA National Awards and Winner of the Best Innovative Green Building (global) from MIPIM Awards 2015.[1]

Controversy[edit]

In February 2015, an article was published citing that a number of issues encountered by residents at One Central Park had led them to consider legal action.[30] Concerns were raised regarding matters involving prostitution being offered in a number of apartments, the accessibility of the private gym to non-residents (reference was made to an incident where a resident was physically attacked), the vulnerability of the terrace pool to high winds and debris, flooding and leakages in the car park in addition to problems with the gym's roof due to poor electrical work resulting in burn marks and the fiberglass insulation being exposed.[30]

In response to the matters, joint developers Fraser Property and Sekisui House were quoted in the article addressing a variety of these issues. The developers offered further explanation as to why the above incidents had occurred and in some cases highlighted the action being taken to help rectify them.[30]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Central Park Sydney". www.centralparksydney.com. Retrieved 2015-08-29.
  2. ^ a b c d e "Frasers Property - Central Park, Sydney". www.frasersproperty.com.au. Retrieved 2015-08-24.
  3. ^ "Where City Meets Nature". Central Park. 2013. Retrieved 2015-08-21.
  4. ^ a b "Central Park Sydney - Amenities and features". www.centralparksydney.com. Retrieved 2015-08-24.
  5. ^ "Central Park receives its first three 5 Star Green Star ratings" (PDF). Fraser Property. 30 October 2013. Archived from the original (PDF) on 1 March 2015. Retrieved 21 August 2015.
  6. ^ "Central Park receives its first three 5 Star Green Star ratings". www.sekisuihouse.com.au. Archived from the original on 10 March 2015. Retrieved 24 August 2015.
  7. ^ a b c d Tan, Monica. "Sydney's One Central Park wins international best tall building award". the Guardian. Retrieved 2015-08-24.
  8. ^ a b c d e de Manincor, John (2014-05-01). "One Central Park". Architecture Australia. Retrieved 2015-08-21.
  9. ^ "Central Park Sydney - The Visionaries". www.centralparksydney.com. Retrieved 2015-08-24.
  10. ^ a b "Central Park Sydney - Building Central Park". www.centralparksydney.com. Retrieved 2015-08-24.
  11. ^ a b c d e f "Sky high demand for penthouse apartments at Sky at One Central Park" (PDF). Fraser Property. 2014-05-20. Retrieved 2014-08-24.
  12. ^ "Central Park Fact sheet" (PDF). Fraser Property. 2014-06-01. Retrieved 2015-08-24.
  13. ^ "Unilodge @ Central Park". www.centralparksydney.com. Retrieved 2015-08-24.
  14. ^ "The Steps Central Park". www.centralparksydney.com. Retrieved 2015-08-24.
  15. ^ "Connor". www.centralparksydney.com. Retrieved 2015-08-24.
  16. ^ a b c "Central Park reaches $1 billion in apartment sales" (PDF). Fraser Property. 2014-02-21. Retrieved 2015-08-24.
  17. ^ a b c d e f g h "One Central Park a landmark project for Watpac" (PDF). Watpac. 2014-07-07. Retrieved 2015-08-28.
  18. ^ "Central Park - City of Sydney". www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au. Retrieved 2015-08-29.
  19. ^ a b c "One Central Park - The Skyscraper Center". skyscrapercenter.com. Retrieved 2015-08-29.
  20. ^ a b c d e "Central Park Sydney - Interior Styling". www.centralparksydney.com. Retrieved 2015-08-29.
  21. ^ a b "Central Park Sydney - Patrick Blanc". www.centralparksydney.com. Retrieved 2015-08-29.
  22. ^ "Patrick Blanc's vertical gardens at One Central Park..." (PDF). Fraser Property. 2014-07-07. Retrieved 2015-08-28.
  23. ^ a b c "The story behind Patrick Blanc vertical gardens at Sydney's One Central Park | Architecture And Design". Architecture And Design. Retrieved 2015-08-29.
  24. ^ http://junglefy.com.au/portfolio/one-central-park/
  25. ^ a b c d e f "Central Park's mysterious heliostat explained". Domain News. Retrieved 2015-08-29.
  26. ^ "Central Park Sydney - Architecture and Design". www.centralparksydney.com. Retrieved 2015-08-29.
  27. ^ "Central Park Sydney - Architecture and Design". www.centralparksydney.com. Retrieved 2015-08-29.
  28. ^ a b c d e f g h "Central Park Sydney - A Sustainable Habitat". www.centralparksydney.com. Retrieved 2015-08-29.
  29. ^ a b c d e f "Central Park Sydney - Amenities and features". www.centralparksydney.com. Retrieved 2015-08-29.
  30. ^ a b c Rolfe, John (2015-02-26). "Central Park residents furious at living with sex workers and shoddy workmanship". The Daily Telegraph. The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 2015-08-31.