Market urbanism

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Market urbanism is an urban policy theory which advocates for the liberalization of urban planning and transportation policy. Market urbanists support loosening urban land use and zoning regulations, implementing congestion pricing on public roads, and applying classical liberal theory to urban policy issues.[1][2][3]

In July 2018, Facebook group New Urbanist Memes for Transit-Oriented Teens moderator Emily Orenstein reported there was "an uptick of 'market urbanist types' following coverage on CityLab."[4]

In an article in the National Review (a conservative editorial magazine) in August 2018, Jibran Khan comments that "...[Kamala] Harris' bill [which would give tax subsidies to renters] could compound the problems facing renters, by reducing the political pressure — currently building from both left and right in California via the “market urbanism” movement — to tackle the lack of housing."[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Amateur Economist: Zoning Hurts Housing Affordability
  2. ^ How Pricing Tolls Right Eliminates Congestion
  3. ^ Who Plans?: Jane Jacobs’ Hayekian critique of urban planning
  4. ^ Hunt, Elle (5 July 2018). "Meet the Numtots: the millennials who find fixing public transit sexy". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  5. ^ Khan, Jibran (2018-08-01). "Kamala Harris's Rent Subsidy Would Help Landlords, Not Renters". National Review. Archived from the original on 2018-08-02. Retrieved 2018-08-23. Indeed, Harris’s bill could compound the problems facing renters, by reducing the political pressure — currently building from both left and right in California via the “market urbanism” movement — to tackle the lack of housing. Defenders of the status quo will simply point to the Harris plan and insist that something has been done. ... If Harris is truly concerned about the plight of city renters, she ought to spend some time listening to the concerns of the market urbanists, and to use her influence to support attempts at housing reform in California.