Kakanj culture

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Kakanj culture
Geographical rangeCentral Bosnia
PeriodNeolithic Europe
Datesc. 6230 BC – c. 4900 BC
Major sitesKakanj - Obre, Obre II, Papratnica, Plandište; Visoko - Arnautovići, Okolište; Zavidovići - Tuk
Preceded byCardium pottery, Starčevo culture
Followed byButmir culture

Kakanj culture was early neolithic culture that appeared in Central Bosnia and covered periods dated from 6230–5990 to 5300–4900 B.C.E.

History[edit]

Central Bosnia, areas in Sarajevo, Visoko and Zenica basins were one of the main areas of prehistoric populations, especially along the shores of river Bosna. Central Bosnia was already populated with other cultures like Starčevo and Cardium pottery which were the basis for creation of unique culture that is known as Kakanj culture[1], as first findings were at the site called Obre, near town of Kakanj.[2] Maria Gimbutas regarded Kakanj culture as local variant of Starčevo, with elements of Danilo group.[3]

Other known locations of this culture are sited at: Kakanj – Plandište, Papratnica; Visoko – Arnautovići, Okolište, and Tuk near Zavidovići. Kakanj culture will have great influence on the forming of Butmir culture.[4][5]

Settlements and artefacts[edit]

Excavated settlements were not uniform. Site in Obre included rectangular houses with 1 or 2 rooms, foundations made of stone and clay loam walls. Stone tools are predominant, especially molded hatchets. Tools like spatulas and needles were made out of bones.[6]

Pottery is versatile, coarse and monochrome.[7] The surface of the monochrome ceramics is well polished, as is in Butmir culture. The shapes include vessels with tall hollow conical stems, alongside bowls with thicker rims and 4-foot rhytons.[8] Plastic is poorly represented.

See Also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gimbutas, Marija; Alseikaitė (1974). The Gods and Goddesses of Old Europe: 7000 to 3500 BC Myths, Legends and Cult Images. University of California Press. ISBN 9780520019959.
  2. ^ Čović, Borivoj (1988). Arheološki leksikon BiH, Volume 2. Sarajevo: National Museum of Bosnia and Herzegovina. p. 16.
  3. ^ Tringham, Ruth (2014-11-13). Hunters, Fishers and Farmers of Eastern Europe, 6000-3000 B.C. Routledge. ISBN 9781317599463.
  4. ^ Studies in Mediterranean Archaeology. C. Bloms. 1967.
  5. ^ Boardman, John; Edwards, I. E. S.; Hammond, N. G. L.; Sollberger, E. (1970). The Cambridge Ancient History. Cambridge University Press. pp. 135. ISBN 9780521224963.
  6. ^ Whitehouse, Ruth D. (2016-02-24). Macmillan Dictionary of Archaeology. Macmillan International Higher Education. p. 248. ISBN 9781349075898.
  7. ^ Boardman, John; Edwards, I. E. S.; Hammond, N. G. L.; Sollberger, E. (1970). The Cambridge Ancient History. Cambridge University Press. pp. 113. ISBN 9780521224963.
  8. ^ Boardman, John; Edwards, I. E. S.; Hammond, N. G. L.; Sollberger, E. (1970). The Cambridge Ancient History. Cambridge University Press. pp. 113. ISBN 9780521224963.

External links[edit]